Author Topic: "Please give me a job in the UK"  (Read 26784 times)

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Offline Suzanne

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Re: "Please give me a job in the UK"
« Reply #30 on: January 28, 2005, 03:55:34 AM »
I guess, to sum up the difference, students here, at the age of 16, decide to go on the university path, or the trade school path (e.g.,to be a mechanic, plumber, computer technician--vs. a computer science major--etc.) path. I've noticed there's some confusion when talking to Brits about engineering degrees--a couple I've spoken with confuse a two-year electronics degree (the equivalent of maybe a two-year associate's degree in the States, or a trade school certification) with that of a four-year electrical engineering university degree (EE is probably the hardest major there is). Also, it takes three years to get a bachelor's here, whereas it takes four years in the States (typically 120 credits or "hours" required, breaking down into an average of 15 a semester for eight semesters). Anything else I'm missing? So A levels go toward the uni path, and O toward the trade school path?

Formica, another thought: The rule of thumb I've always heard is to keep your resume (actually, with a Ph.D., you have the right to call it a CV, by U.S. standards) to one page per 10 years of work experience. Obviously, depending on the position you're applying for, a separate list of publications would be due, as well. I'd include that with the resume, but not provide a list of references unless asked (the old "References available upon request"). Also, I see nothing wrong for you to say, IF asked why you want to live here, that your family is here, you've always been interested in England, etc. BUT be sure to include a professional slant in your answer: something about the job potential you see here, what you could offer, etc.

Also, it's smart of you not to let an interviewer know that your decision to move here hinges on your getting the job. Giving personal reasons is usually a turnoff to an employer. (It's akin to the rule about asking for a raise--you'd never tell your employer you were broke, had kids to feed, had debt collectors knocking on your door--that's not their problem; it's yours. You ask for a raise by having documented proof at hand about your achievements since the last time your salary was assessed.) Okay, so much for my six cents worth. :)

Offline balmerhon

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Re: "Please give me a job in the UK"
« Reply #31 on: January 28, 2005, 10:06:19 AM »
Education for British students is typically more intense than that of American students if you compare them by age. An 18 year old British student will be about a year ahead of an American.  That's partly why undergrad degrees here are only 3 years.

*disclaimer*  this is in the ideal world... of course it varies region by region and student to student - but every American I have met who has taught in the US and UK at Uni level has agreed with this to a certain degree.

A whole other issue is whether or not a 16 year old should be making decisions about their long term career plans. That to me is the REAL difference between British and American education.
When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life. When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down ‘happy’. They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, and I told them they didn’t understand life. ~ John Lennon

Mister_Nibbles

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Re: "Please give me a job in the UK"
« Reply #32 on: January 28, 2005, 10:10:17 AM »
Education for British students is typically more intense than that of American students if you compare them by age. An 18 year old British student will be about a year ahead of an American.  That's partly why undergrad degrees here are only 3 years.

Since we're talking 'British,' worth keeping in mind that Scottish undergrad degrees are 4 years. And it kinda backs up Balmerhon's point, as I found that Scottish students were at least six months behind English students when they started unversity, and that was why the McUniversities needed the extra year.

Offline balmerhon

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Re: "Please give me a job in the UK"
« Reply #33 on: January 28, 2005, 10:14:49 AM »
True Mr Nibbles - I forgot about the difference in Scotland. I also know that a lot of the programs in the English unis that are 4 years are under a great deal of pressure to change to 3 - The dept where I am doing my PhD was a rare example of a 4 year graphic design degree. Last year they were essentially forced to go to 3 years as kids just weren't interested in a longer program and enrollment was down.
When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life. When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down ‘happy’. They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, and I told them they didn’t understand life. ~ John Lennon

expat_in_scotland

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Re: "Please give me a job in the UK"
« Reply #34 on: January 28, 2005, 10:32:58 AM »
The degree course (excepting medicine, veterinary medicine and dentistry) is 4 years at Edinburgh University for honours.  You can still do an 'ordinary' degree in 3 years, however, but an ordinary degree may make entry into some post-grad programmes or jobs more difficult.

Mister_Nibbles

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Re: "Please give me a job in the UK"
« Reply #35 on: January 28, 2005, 10:38:29 AM »
Hey, that's right, I forgot about the ordinary degrees. When I was at Edinburgh (a zillion years ago) the ordinary degrees were not given much respect, compared to a 3-year degree from a decent English university.  I don't know if things have changed since then.

Offline Busymum

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Re: "Please give me a job in the UK"
« Reply #36 on: January 28, 2005, 07:30:23 PM »
Thank you Graham, and everyone, for taking so much of your time to help those like me have a better chance of becoming employed in the UK.   I think it was Dr. Steve who said it helped him to feel more prepared, and I must agree.  After spending all hours of the night rewriting my resume into a more usuable CV form, it was of great help to me to get a better idea of how to address my strengths.

Thank you again!
"Mind is the Master power that molds and makes,
And Man is Mind, and evermore he takes
The tool of Thought, and, shaping what he wills,
Brings forth a thousand joys, a thousand ills:
He thinks in secret, and it comes to pass,
Environment is but his looking glass."
 -James Allen, "As a Man Thinketh"

Offline ny_2_uk

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Re: "Please give me a job in the UK"
« Reply #37 on: January 28, 2005, 10:13:59 PM »
Thanks Graham! Wonderful posts  :-*
Lived in Cheltenham, England> 2003-2004
Lived in London, England> August 2005- April 2009
Back home in Brooklyn, NY since April 2009


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