Author Topic: Advice for those who have just arrived on a spousal visa  (Read 26144 times)

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Offline JenandChris

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Re: Advice for those who have just arrived on a spousal visa
« Reply #15 on: June 28, 2011, 07:11:57 PM »
A quick question about this.  Am I right in thinking (sure I read it somewhere) that all NHS charges should be given up front and the choice on whether or not to pay or refuse treatment would be given?

Phew! That's a relief.

Offline Shandy

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Re: Advice for those who have just arrived on a spousal visa
« Reply #16 on: June 28, 2011, 07:39:06 PM »
Phew! That's a relief.

Taken from Tower Hamlet NHS trust:

Section C: Patients Liable to Settle Charges Personally
3.8 When the Admission Record Form is completed, if it appears from the address that the
patient is from a country without reciprocal arrangements, the Chief Cashier is contacted
by telephone.
3.9 As a method of cross check, when the Admission Record is entered onto the Patient
Management System the software includes a table of countries which will indicate both
on screen and in printed reports patients from countries with no reciprocal
arrangements.
3.10 As soon as possible after notification the Chief Cashier will interview the patient, if
necessary with the assistance of an interpreter.
3.11 A form "NHS Charges to Overseas Visitors" is completed and signed by the person
undertaking to pay for the treatment. This could be someone other than the patient.
3.12 The Chief Cashier then prepares an invoice for submission to the person signing the
undertaking to pay for the treatment.
3.13 Prices are determined by reference to the Trust’s activity price list.
3.14 The income is only bought to account when payment is received.
3.15 Every attempt is made to obtain payment prior to the patient's discharge. Payment can
be made by major credit cards in addition to cheques, sterling and foreign currency. For
foreign currency the rate of exchange is ascertained from the Trust's bankers.
3.16 If payment is not obtained prior to the patient’s discharge an invoice is sent to the given
address requesting payment.
3.17 If payment is not received within one month the Finance Department then follow up with
two further reminders.
3.18 As income is only bought to account when payment is received there is no requirement
to write off any sums not received.

Maybe all NHS trusts are different but surely the person getting the treatment should be told there is a change up front?  I'm guessing the only way they wouldn't bill you up front if they were going to bill you would be if you needed the treatment on an urgent basis (not in ER though as that's free)

Also found this from the new guidlines from August 2011

Recommended timeline for establishing a patient’s entitlement to free treatment and applying relevant charges
4.21 When a patient is in need of immediately necessary treatment, it may not be appropriate, or possible, to inform them ahead of treatment commencing that charges might apply, nor to secure from them an agreement to pay those charges. Patients who, after baseline questioning (see paragraph 5.20 to 5.28), appear not to have lived lawfully in the UK for the previous 12 months, should be notified that charges might apply at the earliest appropriate opportunity and they should subsequently be interviewed by an OVM to establish this definitively when it is medically appropriate to do so. Patients should not be told by anyone that charges will not apply until this is formally established.
4.22 In circumstances where it is possible and appropriate to assess charges and request payment before or during a course of immediately necessary treatment, relevant NHS bodies should be clear to the patient that treatment will not be withheld or delayed if they do not pay in advance.
4.23 If and when it is established that charges apply, the patient should be informed and presented with a bill for the treatment they have received, but patients who may be in need of further immediately necessary or urgent treatment should not be discouraged from receiving it, even if they indicate that they are unable to pay. In some cases, it may be appropriate not to present a bill until all immediately necessary or urgent treatment has completed, but patients should nevertheless be fully informed about the charges they might face.
4.24 An overseas visitor whose need for treatment after admission from A&E or from a GP referral is not immediate, should be interviewed by the OVM at the earliest appropriate
47
opportunity and before a course of treatment commences to establish if they are entitled to free treatment or have to pay.
4.25 However, if it is established that the patient is a chargeable overseas visitor who claims he cannot pay, and this has been done before the patient has seen the clinician, the patient must not then be prevented from going on to see the clinician, since it will be necessary for the clinician to determine what treatment is needed and the level of urgency. Only when a clinician confirms that the need for treatment is non-urgent should treatment be withheld, pending payment.
4.26 When, after this initial assessment, clinicians consider the need for treatment to be urgent, relevant NHS bodies are strongly advised to seek a deposit equivalent to the estimated full cost of treatment during the period before treatment is to commence. If it is not possible to secure payment, treatment should not be cancelled or delayed.
4.27 However, where a clinician considers that a chargeable patient’s need for treatment is non-urgent, further treatment processes, eg putting the patient on a waiting list or booking outpatient clinics, should not be initiated until a deposit equivalent to the estimated full cost of treatment has been obtained. Any surplus which is paid can be returned to the patient on completion of treatment. This is not refusing to provide treatment, it is requiring payment conditions to be met in accordance with the Charging Regulations before treatment can commence.
4.28 When providing immediately necessary or urgent treatment clinicians should be asked to complete an advice from Doctors or Dentists form at Appendix 2 which should then be documented in the patient’s notes and a copy sent to the relevant service/delivery manager.
« Last Edit: June 28, 2011, 07:56:58 PM by Shandy »

garry

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Re: Advice for those who have just arrived on a spousal visa
« Reply #17 on: June 29, 2011, 11:33:09 AM »
A quick question about this.  Am I right in thinking (sure I read it somewhere) that all NHS charges should be given up front and the choice on whether or not to pay or refuse treatment would be given?

In theory yes, in practice it's sometimes yes and sometimes no.  If the back office is playing catch up, a person can accrue fees long after they left.

Offline Shandy

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Re: Advice for those who have just arrived on a spousal visa
« Reply #18 on: June 29, 2011, 02:06:19 PM »
In theory yes, in practice it's sometimes yes and sometimes no.  If the back office is playing catch up, a person can accrue fees long after they left.

How will you find out, will they let you know?  Does it have to be over £1000 to be a reason for subsequent visa refusal?

garry

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Re: Advice for those who have just arrived on a spousal visa
« Reply #19 on: June 29, 2011, 03:37:15 PM »
How will you find out, will they let you know?  Does it have to be over £1000 to be a reason for subsequent visa refusal?

We don't have any further info on enforcement/compliance yet.  I am taking a course in this new NHS debt rule in August and will (hopefully) have lots more details then.

In the event somebody gets refused, please let me know...

Offline kermitklein

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Re: Advice for those who have just arrived on a spousal visa
« Reply #20 on: August 02, 2011, 09:48:12 AM »
One addtional thing would be good as well...
If you can get progressive photo of you and your partner to show (ie whilst on holiday or special occasion - xmas etc) then this would be good as well. This shows that you have been together since the spousal visa. It is not a necessity but certainly a good thing to have just in case.





Offline bookgrl

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Re: Advice for those who have just arrived on a spousal visa
« Reply #21 on: August 02, 2011, 12:30:21 PM »
Why would you need progressive photos to get your ILR?  They ask for mail because they want mail. 

I don't even know where you would include that in your application package. 

It is just one more thing they won't bother to look at and if you are mailing it in to add to the weight.

I think we have had a total of two photos taken together in our 6 year relationship.

Offline mirrajay

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Re: Advice for those who have just arrived on a spousal visa
« Reply #22 on: August 03, 2011, 12:32:17 PM »
One addtional thing would be good as well...
If you can get progressive photo of you and your partner to show (ie whilst on holiday or special occasion - xmas etc) then this would be good as well. This shows that you have been together since the spousal visa. It is not a necessity but certainly a good thing to have just in case.

They really wont consider this as any kind of proof.  Photos can be easily staged.  And as Bookgrl says - they dont ask for them, so they wont bother to look at them.

Offline winner

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Re: Advice for those who have just arrived on a spousal visa
« Reply #23 on: August 06, 2011, 08:23:10 AM »
Having seen several posts on here from people who’ve run into trouble when applying for ILR, I thought I’d create a list of do’s and don’ts for after you get your spousal visa.   Most of this applies to fiancés except the bits about working.

Any comments?

•   DON’T enter via Ireland on your first trip to the UK after you get the visa.  You need to ensure your visa gets “activated” by a UK entry stamp.  
•   DO get the names of both you and your partner added to the council tax and all utility bills as quickly as possible.  
•   DON’T sign up for paperless billing or online-only bank accounts – you need a paper trail for ILR.  Being green will have to wait.
•   DO know when your visa expires and when you are eligible for ILR.  Sounds obvious but we have seen several people who forgot their expiry date and overstayed!
•   DO ensure you are paying the right amount of taxes if you are working.  If you are self employed, register with HMRC.   They will check if you have been paying the correct taxes when you apply for Citizenship.
•   DO repay any money you owe to the NHS.  If you don’t, they will catch you when you apply for ILR.
•       DO keep hold of any payslips for you and your partner, and any other proof of employment.
•   DON’T leave taking the Life in the UK test to the last minute.  The test is simple but there is a lot of information to memorise, plus it can be hard to get a test appointment at short notice.
•   DO read up on the residence requirements for Citizenship, to ensure you don’t spend too many days out of the UK.
•   DO think about who might be your Citizenship referees
•   DO start saving up for the ILR and Citizenship fees.   The total price of ILR + Citizenship is currently £1900 and goes up approx £200 every 6 months.
•   DO know what counts as “public funds” and what doesn’t.   Take extreme care if your partner/children are applying for or receiving benefits as most DWP employees don’t know the rules for persons under immigration control.

Thank you very much for your post. I am getting ready for my test and application, so your tips are very helpfull.
So far I am reading the book Life in UK, and wondering if you can plese tell me where should I pass the test? Can I do online or I have to go in person?
Many thanks

Offline ChillyWilly

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Re: Advice for those who have just arrived on a spousal visa
« Reply #24 on: August 06, 2011, 08:49:44 AM »
You have to do it in person.
Information is here http://lifeintheuktest.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/

Offline vann1348

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Re: Advice for those who have just arrived on a spousal visa
« Reply #25 on: August 12, 2011, 01:11:08 AM »
Quote
•   DON’T enter via Ireland on your first trip to the UK after you get the visa.  You need to ensure your visa gets “activated” by a UK entry stamp.

I have yet to submit my visa application, but in the process of doing so within the next week, and I've been looking at flights and all seem to have layovers in Ireland that don't cost thousands of dollars. Is this ok? Would I need to do something extra if I do fly through Ireland? Thanks

Offline NoseOverTail

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Re: Advice for those who have just arrived on a spousal visa
« Reply #26 on: August 12, 2011, 07:09:46 AM »
I have yet to submit my visa application, but in the process of doing so within the next week, and I've been looking at flights and all seem to have layovers in Ireland that don't cost thousands of dollars. Is this ok? Would I need to do something extra if I do fly through Ireland? Thanks

You would need to save your boarding pass/itinerary for when you apply for subsequent visas, to show when you entered the UK on your visa.  Normally you would get a stamp on the visa when you enter the UK to show the date you entered, but if you fly through ROI first, that won't happen because you won't go through immigration when you reach the UK from there.

Try to fly through Belfast if you can.  It tends to be comparable to flying through Dublin, but it's the UK, so you get the cheaper fare along with the stamp.
"It is really a matter of ending this silence and solitude, of breathing and stretching one's arms again."

Offline vann1348

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Re: Advice for those who have just arrived on a spousal visa
« Reply #27 on: August 12, 2011, 03:51:12 PM »
Quote
You would need to save your boarding pass/itinerary for when you apply for subsequent visas, to show when you entered the UK on your visa.  Normally you would get a stamp on the visa when you enter the UK to show the date you entered, but if you fly through ROI first, that won't happen because you won't go through immigration when you reach the UK from there.

Try to fly through Belfast if you can.  It tends to be comparable to flying through Dublin, but it's the UK, so you get the cheaper fare along with the stamp.

Thank You NoseOverTail. If I wasn't able to go through Belfast first and do end up in Dublin, then on to Bristol for my final destination, would I be able to in Bristol ask them to stamp my visa and show them my itinerary and boarding pass? Or would they typically not do this?

Offline DrSuperL99

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Re: Advice for those who have just arrived on a spousal visa
« Reply #28 on: August 12, 2011, 03:52:58 PM »
Nope, they're not allowed to do it. Even if you hunted them down and asked for a stamp they won't give it. Lots of people have had this problem.
Arrived as student 9/2003; Renewed student visa 9/2006; Applied for HSMP approval 1/2008; HSMP approved 3/2008; Tier 1 General FLR received 4/2008; FLR(M) Unmarried partner approved (in-person) 27/8/2009; ILR granted at in-person PEO appointment 1/8/2011; Applied for citizenship at Edinburgh NCS 31/10/2011; Citizenship approval received 4/2/2012
FINALLY A CITIZEN! 29/2/2012

Offline vann1348

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Re: Advice for those who have just arrived on a spousal visa
« Reply #29 on: August 12, 2011, 04:07:12 PM »
Quote
Nope, they're not allowed to do it. Even if you hunted them down and asked for a stamp they won't give it. Lots of people have had this problem.

Darn, thank you though! I'll try my hardest to not go through Ireland first to avoid not ending up with a stamp.