Author Topic: Adapting to the damp cold.  (Read 2716 times)

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Offline Meghan2828

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Adapting to the damp cold.
« on: December 11, 2012, 05:13:58 PM »
So I now live in the south east and after 4 months here I have to say, the one thing I am really struggling with is adapting to the damp cold air. Now, I am from Minnesota so cold shouldn't be a big deal. But I find myself getting chilled all the time. Tonight I am off to the doctor to deal with a cough I have had since about October 29th. Never really felt sick, just run down and when outside... chilled. Does anyone else have this problem? And yes, I do dress in layers. And wear mittens (though it feels odd to be in earmuffs and mittens with no snow).

Just wondering if anyone else had this problem? I put it here because I'd like to get outside and start walking/running again and this pesky problem is really kicking my butt.
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Offline elle.davis

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Re: Adapting to the damp cold.
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2012, 07:27:26 PM »
I know what you mean about being used to the cold but not the damp cold. I'm from northeast Ohio and never had massive problems keeping warm in the winter, but now I do. I don't have a cough. I have, however, developed a constantly runny nose, which kindly continues year round since the humidity never disappears!

I hope the doctor can help. If they give you any tips for adjusting to damp cold, please share!
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Offline Red5

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Re: Adapting to the damp cold.
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2012, 10:32:45 AM »
No advice, but I totally understand about never feeling warm due to the dampness. 
It doesn't help that I keep the heating off in the house during the day as it is just me here. 

Offline Meghan2828

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Re: Adapting to the damp cold.
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2012, 10:36:54 AM »
I went to the doctor yesterday and got antibiotics and other stuff to whip this cold or what ever it is that I have. I think it's just going to take time for me to adapt. We live right on the coastline so I don't see ever getting away from the damp. No wonder there is moss growing on everything!

I've turned our heaters on and then I boil water to put warm moisture in the air. Crazy!
June 1989: 1st time we met.
June 2009: Reconnected... yes on FaceBook.
Jan 2010: he invited me to the UK by saying "get your ars* on a plane!"
May 2010: I arrive in UK for visit.
April 2011: ask him to marry me.
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Offline equestrianerd

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Re: Adapting to the damp cold.
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2012, 10:52:04 AM »
It doesn't help that I keep the heating off in the house during the day as it is just me here. 

Me too. I wear long underwear and wool socks, and currently have a space heater blowing at my legs. That, plus sitting wrapped with a blanket on my lap, usually keeps me warm in the flat, even with the heat off.
Moved to London February 5, 2010

StealthG

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Re: Adapting to the damp cold.
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2012, 07:14:01 PM »
Yep - definitely know what you are talking about.  I don't know if I've just wussed out over the years or what, but I have lived a few places where its snows and I don't ever remember being so miserable.  I've tried 3-4 layers uptop with pants and leggings under them with double socks, scarf, hat, hoodie and gloves. When I'm dressing myself to go outside I'm reminded of that kid brother from the movie "Christmas Story". Still cold and irritable... very irritable!  >:(  I guess you could construct some sort of suit made of multiple hot water bottles strapped to your body...  :P

Offline Cadenza

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Re: Adapting to the damp cold.
« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2012, 07:26:46 PM »
It didn't help that people tend to keep their houses colder here either.  I'm more used to it now after six years.  I still freeze a lot though--but I have to laugh when relatives visit from the States and I see how freezing they are at home when I'm okay, and I realise I've adapted more than I thought.

Offline PickledSakura

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Re: Adapting to the damp cold.
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2012, 07:53:01 PM »
I've tried 3-4 layers uptop with pants and leggings under them with double socks, scarf, hat, hoodie and gloves.

Hahaha, this was SO ME today!  I left the house this morning with the following on:

Tops:  one of those thermal undershirts, a long sleeve t-shirt, and a cardigan.
Bottoms:  Long leggings (as opposed to my 3/4 ones), jeans
Feet:  Long socks, short socks.

Outerwear: 
Double-lined Columbia ski coat
Two scarves
Two hats
One pair of Thinsulate lined gloves.

Before I left the house (in London), my phone said the temperature was -2.  I wasn't happy.  By the time I got to the train station work (in Hertfordshire), it was -4.  I quickly decided I'd be take a taxi in lieu of my 35 minute walk!!
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Offline Meghan2828

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Re: Adapting to the damp cold.
« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2012, 03:53:05 PM »
Hot water bottle suit, perfect!
June 1989: 1st time we met.
June 2009: Reconnected... yes on FaceBook.
Jan 2010: he invited me to the UK by saying "get your ars* on a plane!"
May 2010: I arrive in UK for visit.
April 2011: ask him to marry me.
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Offline Brigette

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Re: Adapting to the damp cold.
« Reply #9 on: January 01, 2013, 07:32:04 PM »
I am always freezing in the winter so this is one thing that worries me :( I guess I will eventually adjust.. It's the period of adjustment that has me worried...

StealthG

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Re: Adapting to the damp cold.
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2013, 03:20:37 PM »
Alright, I was kidding earlier about the hot water bottle suit, but apparently after speaking to hubby that kind of thing IS done here. Hubby says people fill up a hot water bottle and strap it to their belly area using a belt. Can anyone back me up here? Or is he just messing with me?  I'm sure it would feel good. I'm just not used to the bottles and afraid they will randomly start spurting burning hot magma water onto me and burn my flesh off. But I guess it's worth a try.  Not like it's ever warm enough to actually wear something to expose your now burnt belly flesh anyway...  ;D

Offline ksand24

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Re: Adapting to the damp cold.
« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2013, 03:27:32 PM »
Alright, I was kidding earlier about the hot water bottle suit, but apparently after speaking to hubby that kind of thing IS done here. Hubby says people fill up a hot water bottle and strap it to their belly area using a belt. Can anyone back me up here? Or is he just messing with me?  I'm sure it would feel good. I'm just not used to the bottles and afraid they will randomly start spurting burning hot magma water onto me and burn my flesh off. But I guess it's worth a try.  Not like it's ever warm enough to actually wear something to expose your now burnt belly flesh anyway...  ;D

Well, I don't strap it to my body (I haven't heard of people actually doing that before), but I do often fill a hot water bottle and hug it to my stomach (over my clothes) when I'm cold.

I've been using hot water bottles for years (every day/night in the colder months) and have not yet experienced any spurting of hot magma water :P. They're pretty sturdy and most will withstand at least a couple of years of regular use without leaking or splitting.

Offline chary

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Re: Adapting to the damp cold.
« Reply #12 on: January 26, 2013, 04:39:11 PM »
Well, I don't strap it to my body (I haven't heard of people actually doing that before), but I do often fill a hot water bottle and hug it to my stomach (over my clothes) when I'm cold.

I clamp mine between my thighs. In fact, there's one there right now!  ;D
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Thaumata

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Re: Adapting to the damp cold.
« Reply #13 on: January 26, 2013, 06:18:18 PM »
It took me a long time to get used to it, too, and I'm from Chicago originally.

It makes me really laugh now to say this, but the thing that helps me the most is... drinking tea. :P It's hilarious because when I first moved across, I thought tea was vile and drinking it actually made me feel queasy, and now, four+ years later, I'm like "hey, boil the kettle, will you?" I have been assimilated.

Never heard of strapping on your hot water bottle, but my MIL in Belfast has sent them to bed with us before to keep us warm. Seems everyone sells beanbag style ones now - might be nice to have on the sofa while you're home. 

For going outside, I have always found your first line of defense should be waterproof stuff. I live pretty far north, but I'm near the coast and it doesn't snow a lot, just rains and rains and rains for months. The best coat I have for this is one with a waterproof windbreaking shell and a zip-in fleece lining. It's warmer than any of my other heavier duty ones I bought during arctic Chicago winters because it keeps the rain out. It's nice that it has a hood, too, so I don't always feel like I need an umbrella when it's just that not-really-raining-but-definitely-drizzling-all-day kind of weather.

Also, invest in some good waterproof shoes. I still lament the lack of cheap Payless shoes in my life, but it really is worth your money to get good leather ones here, because they will keep your toes dry. The less soggy you are, the better you will feel, not just when you're out, but when you get home, too, and don't have to put your socks on the radiator to dry out.

I've always found it helps me to own a ridiculously cheerful umbrella, too. My husband wouldn't be caught dead with one (he likes black, plain black) but I need all the motivation I can get to drag my butt outside for some fresh air on a rainy day.



Offline Brigette

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Re: Adapting to the damp cold.
« Reply #14 on: January 26, 2013, 10:45:34 PM »
It took me a long time to get used to it, too, and I'm from Chicago originally.

It makes me really laugh now to say this, but the thing that helps me the most is... drinking tea. :P It's hilarious because when I first moved across, I thought tea was vile and drinking it actually made me feel queasy, and now, four+ years later, I'm like "hey, boil the kettle, will you?" I have been assimilated.

Never heard of strapping on your hot water bottle, but my MIL in Belfast has sent them to bed with us before to keep us warm. Seems everyone sells beanbag style ones now - might be nice to have on the sofa while you're home. 

For going outside, I have always found your first line of defense should be waterproof stuff. I live pretty far north, but I'm near the coast and it doesn't snow a lot, just rains and rains and rains for months. The best coat I have for this is one with a waterproof windbreaking shell and a zip-in fleece lining. It's warmer than any of my other heavier duty ones I bought during arctic Chicago winters because it keeps the rain out. It's nice that it has a hood, too, so I don't always feel like I need an umbrella when it's just that not-really-raining-but-definitely-drizzling-all-day kind of weather.

Also, invest in some good waterproof shoes. I still lament the lack of cheap Payless shoes in my life, but it really is worth your money to get good leather ones here, because they will keep your toes dry. The less soggy you are, the better you will feel, not just when you're out, but when you get home, too, and don't have to put your socks on the radiator to dry out.

I've always found it helps me to own a ridiculously cheerful umbrella, too. My husband wouldn't be caught dead with one (he likes black, plain black) but I need all the motivation I can get to drag my butt outside for some fresh air on a rainy day.





Does Wellies help to keep your feet dry or is that only for a particular type of weather?