Author Topic: Job searching  (Read 2287 times)

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Offline Eh127929

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Job searching
« on: April 04, 2016, 12:15:41 PM »
I'm only a few weeks into job searching, but it is so frustrating I want to scream! I knew it would be hard, but not this hard. Either I don't qualify for a job because I don't have my driver license yet (first thing we're doing once I get a job is have lessons) or I get flat out rejected for work I am qualified for. I do apply for jobs at my skill level but also some below, so it's frustrating when I get denied. People keep telling me to be patient and everything, but I am starting to feel a knock in my confidence. When you spend all day everyday looking for jobs, find only a few you qualify for and get rejected. I also feel slightly limited knowing I can only apply for jobs that I either can catch the bus to or carpool with my husband. As of right now, I am not applying for retail jobs or waitress jobs.. We agreed I could have some time to actually look in my field of interest for a month or two before I just go get any job to bring money in. I'm going to see a recruiter this week, but I still am feeling slightly defeated. And that's silly of me knowing I just started this search. I feel like a fresh out of college student looking for a job again.  Anyways, sorry for the long post. Just had to get it off my chest.

Offline ksand24

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Re: Job searching
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2016, 12:28:36 PM »
It is frustrating, but don't give up.

How long have you been job-hunting for? It could take up to a few months to secure a job, so you just have to keep persevering.

I'd even go for retail and service jobs as well - anything to get your foot in the door in the UK job market.

Do you have any UK job experience at all yet? If not, that may be a factor in why you're not having any luck. A good way to build some UK experience for your CV is to do some volunteering work while you're job-hunting.

I'm a UK citizen with degrees in job shortage fields (theoretical physics and geophysics), but it took me 2 years to secure a graduate job back in 2008-2010. I ended up stuck working in retail for 2 years because there weren't any jobs I was qualified for - no one was hiring graduates, and all the science jobs I found online were either in biological sciences or they required either a PhD and/or 10 years of experience.

Online KFdancer

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Re: Job searching
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2016, 12:42:28 PM »
Hang in there, this is really common unfortunately.

A recruiter is DEFINITELY the way to go.  And register with lots and lots of recruiters.  Also get your resume switched over to a CV and get on LinkedIn.

Totally agree about having ANY type of UK experience.  If you don't want to go into retail or the service industry, consider some volunteer work or temporary work.  These things help.

What is your industry?  Is it something you need UK-qualifications for (something I have found the UK is in love with)?

Offline Eh127929

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Re: Job searching
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2016, 01:04:00 PM »
It's only been about three weeks. I know not much time to start feeling defeated.

I have no experience here. I was going to try to volunteer when I moved but found out I couldn't on a fiancé visa. So I'll need to look into that again.  I think it makes it double frustrating that my husband and parents both think I'll have no issues getting a job.

When I was in America I was in the same boat. I did retail management for two years and worked part time in my field, because it was all I could find. So I'm a bit burned out in the retail world, but in the back of my head I know I need to get over that.

I know it'll happen eventually, just needed to vent to people who understand the process better than my family support team (not to bash them, just they truly don't understand).

Offline Eh127929

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Re: Job searching
« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2016, 01:10:27 PM »
Hang in there, this is really common unfortunately.

A recruiter is DEFINITELY the way to go.  And register with lots and lots of recruiters.  Also get your resume switched over to a CV and get on LinkedIn.

Totally agree about having ANY type of UK experience.  If you don't want to go into retail or the service industry, consider some volunteer work or temporary work.  These things help.

What is your industry?  Is it something you need UK-qualifications for (something I have found the UK is in love with)?

I have a few I'm going to this week, and I'm on LinkedIn already so hopefully that helps some.  I'm not opposed to retail, I was just hoping to have a restart on my career path here.

I have a BA In criminology with a sociology minor and a MA in public administration. So far, I've found either to be particularly useful in my job hunt. I've found some GREAT positions I would love.. But then it comes down to do you have a license. My hope is that I have a lot of experience working with youth and volunteer management with different nonprofits( mostly the ymca). I found some interesting, non police work positions but they require you to be a citizen.

I just need to keep chugging along, I just get frustrated when I vent about t to my husband and he tries his best to be supportive but it's not what I need to hear.

Offline Eh127929

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Re: Job searching
« Reply #5 on: April 04, 2016, 01:26:17 PM »
Oh and by the way, thank you both for listening to me in my little moment of breakdown lol I feel better already!!

Online KFdancer

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Re: Job searching
« Reply #6 on: April 04, 2016, 02:12:43 PM »
I'm sure you feel like you are heaving money right now.  But would it be worth doing a one week intensive course and getting your license now instead of waiting?

Offline Eh127929

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Re: Job searching
« Reply #7 on: April 04, 2016, 02:27:48 PM »
I'm sure you feel like you are heaving money right now.  But would it be worth doing a one week intensive course and getting your license now instead of waiting?


I'll look into it! We're surviving off my husbands income, just trying to be a little cautious in case an emergency comes up. I've driven some here, and have done loads of practice tests online. So, I probably won't need much.

Online KFdancer

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Re: Job searching
« Reply #8 on: April 04, 2016, 03:02:46 PM »

I'll look into it! We're surviving off my husbands income, just trying to be a little cautious in case an emergency comes up. I've driven some here, and have done loads of practice tests online. So, I probably won't need much.

I think they are about £500.  But you could have your license really quick and could open yourself up to more opportunities.

Offline BriKH

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Re: Job searching
« Reply #9 on: April 04, 2016, 03:31:42 PM »
I am sure you have already done these things but definitely make sure your CV is uploaded on sites like Reed, Indeed and the like. I also fin being active on LinkedIn helps, instead of just being signed up to it. Link with many in your industry, link with recruiters, get commenting on articles related to your industry, and so forth.

I totally agree a recruiter will help, but don't just rely on one company. Find a recruiter that specializes in your line of work as well.

Don't worry though, you are doing the right things. It's just a very frustrating process that I will be back into myself soon!

Offline NewMeetsOldEngland

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Re: Job searching
« Reply #10 on: April 04, 2016, 04:14:57 PM »
What is your industry?  Is it something you need UK-qualifications for (something I have found the UK is in love with)?

This. I've found it's much harder to convince employers here that you have transferrable skills. Students seem to have to select their future path so early, and once you do it's very hard to get out of that box. You really have to spell it out and directly relate every point on the job description to your past experience. The easiest route is probably getting some sort of qualification to bolster your application. I think targeting companies that are more likely to have an international workforce, and ones that have customers abroad can be helpful too. You have experience in an international market, so use that to your advantage. You moved to a new country. You are not afraid of challenging or unfamiliar situations (in fact you seek them out), you are flexible and adaptable, and you know how to relate to people with various personalities and cultural backgrounds. These are all things employers value, so make sure you are showing this in your interviews :)

I also found that I had to sell myself a little differently in the UK. I am an introvert and enjoy working independently. My boss now is the stereotypical extorverted American and is always making jokes about me never leaving my cube. I like to remind him of the time I interviewed for a Data Analyst position in London and was told that I was "so friendly and outgoing we thought you would get bored in a role where you have to work independently". If I don't want to be pigeon-holed into sales or customer service roles here I really have to be mindful of how I'm coming across.

I am dreading finding a job once I move. Last time I was on the Post-study work visa (when it still existed) and despite having work authorization I still had a very hard time. A lot of employers just didn't understand how the visa process worked and didn't want to get involved. I was told that no one wanted to hire someone who might have to leave in 2-3 years (but honestly, at that point I was a recent grad and had no plans on staying at the same entry level position for more than three years anyway). I ended up making a niche for myself by doing freelance work for tech start ups in London. There was far less competition for these unknown companies so employers were more willing to take a risk and I got to take on much more responsibilty than I would have at a larger company.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2016, 04:18:11 PM by NewMeetsOldEngland »

Offline ksand24

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Re: Job searching
« Reply #11 on: April 04, 2016, 04:32:59 PM »
You really have to spell it out and directly relate every point on the job description to your past experience.

This is a very good point. With my company, in order to even get through the paper sift and be invited for interview, you have to address every single point mentioned in the application form, complete with personal experiences of how you fulfil each one.

There's a particular masters degree course which people will take specifically to be able to apply for the job I do. One year, all 22 students on that masters course applied for the next training intake for the job. They all had the required qualifications for the job role, but only 2 got invited for interview and just 1 got the job. The rest didn't even make it through the paper sift because they didn't fill out the application form to the standard that was expected.

Offline JennyEye

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Re: Job searching
« Reply #12 on: April 04, 2016, 09:36:00 PM »
It was 7 months till I got a temp job through an agency. Got a long term, 1 year temp contact...now, have been with them for 2 years, 1 year temp, 1 on a permanent contract. Deffo try an agency. Good luck

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Offline TravelingFrog

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Re: Job searching
« Reply #13 on: April 04, 2016, 11:02:44 PM »
It took me about 6 months to find a job after I got FLR.

My first role was just temporary (a few weeks) but the second job (entry level in a field I enjoy) came a lot faster. Two and a half years later and I'm still at the same company (but a different role that I love).

The job hunt got frustrating, so I took a month off from it to take driving lessons and study for the Life in the UK test.

We don't have a car and I wouldn't need the Life in the UK test until two years later, but it was a good time to get them both done and out of the way. No job to work around or scheduling conflicts for lessons.

It meant we were spending more money than usual for a while (driving lessons aren't cheap), but they both needed to be done eventually and they weren't going to get any cheaper or easier.  ;)

Getting my licence also made me feel a bit more settled here, so that could be a good thing to consider (if you can afford it).

Good luck with the job hunt - it's no fun now, but most of us have been there and we understand. :)
July 2012 - Fiancée Visa | Nov 2012 - Married
Dec 2012 - FLR | Nov 2014 - ILR | Dec 2015 - UK Citizen

Online sonofasailor

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Re: Job searching
« Reply #14 on: April 05, 2016, 10:00:50 AM »
Do try and look after your physical and mental health - hydrate, a fast-paced walk everyday, decent diet.

Too, I think as an immigrant you are in a vulnerable position as far as emotional stress/abuse is concerned....and I don't mean this like anyone's spouse is an evil bastard....just that it is easy for the native spouse to not fully grasp the challenges. So, "Hi hun, I'm home...any luck with the job search?" as well-meaning as it may be, can make the vulnerable immigrant feel a bit of a failure.

"You know, hun, my cousin Gemma applied for two openings and got offered both.." can be meant helpfully, but can be tough on someone who just got back a rejection letter.

"You know, maybe you should just drop back and take anything to get in the door," sounds prudent, and can be, it may even be a necessity -  but one has to remember that entry level jobs are often the most hard fought for, with the highest volume of applicants....and often these positions nullify experiential/educational advantages.

I will agree with the posters above that keeping a positive attitude is important, but just look after the physical and mental basics during this time of huge adjustment.
Build your opponent a golden bridge to retreat across - Sun Tzu