Author Topic: Oh, jolly.... driving stuff  (Read 907 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Nan D.

  • *
  • Posts: 238
  • Joined: Sep 2015
  • Liked: 22
Re: Oh, jolly.... driving stuff
« Reply #15 on: January 19, 2017, 05:18:09 PM »
Thanks, all. Well, since we'll be there over the summer and there is only so much "moving in" one can do, I think I'll see if she'll let me buy her the driving lessons for her birthday.  She's been driving for 12 years, but is kind of a nervous driver here. So.... appreciate the advice!

Offline Nan D.

  • *
  • Posts: 238
  • Joined: Sep 2015
  • Liked: 22
Re: Oh, jolly.... driving stuff
« Reply #16 on: January 19, 2017, 05:21:28 PM »
By the way, there's a neat thing here called a car club , the best example being zip car.  You pay to join, then you can rent a car for a few quid per hour.  The cars are parked all over and you open them with your phone. 

This is way easier and cheaper than traditional renting and suits someone who only drives occasionally.

Oh, that's cool!  Thanks.

Offline lyonaria

  • *
  • Posts: 1981
  • Joined: Jun 2014
  • Location: Derbyshire, UK
  • Liked: 205
Re: Oh, jolly.... driving stuff
« Reply #17 on: January 19, 2017, 06:46:09 PM »
There is a bank of 500 questions that they can choose for your theory test, she'll definitely need to do some studying. It's not just reading the highway code. There are genuinely difficult questions they can ask you that aren't in the highway code. She also needa to know what all the road signs mean, those are in a separate book.

I had no issue with my US tests, passed them first time. The UK theory test is kicking my butt.
The usual. American girl meets British guy. They fall into like, then into love. Then there was the big decision. The American traveled across the pond to join the Brit. And life was never the same again.

Offline Nan D.

  • *
  • Posts: 238
  • Joined: Sep 2015
  • Liked: 22
Re: Oh, jolly.... driving stuff
« Reply #18 on: January 19, 2017, 06:57:18 PM »
There is a bank of 500 questions that they can choose for your theory test, she'll definitely need to do some studying. It's not just reading the highway code. There are genuinely difficult questions they can ask you that aren't in the highway code. She also needa to know what all the road signs mean, those are in a separate book.

I had no issue with my US tests, passed them first time. The UK theory test is kicking my butt.

When I ran through the practice test I kept having to remind myself that the illustrations were not intuitive, that I needed to think about them a bit. Sadly afflicted by the "thinking on the wrong-side-of-the-road syndrome." I remember on my first trip to the UK I had studied up on the driving manual (road signs, etc.) in advance, but was toodling around in either Wales or near Bristol and encountered my first instances of roads suddenly narrowing to one lane to squeeze through existing buildings, and the markings on the road that indicated that these bottlenecks were approaching were a mystery to me (as well as how to navigate them). And then there were the streets that were obviously built long before there were cars that had cars parked up on the sidewalks leaving barely enough room for one car to get through at a time, as well.  (That was fun on jet lag! Thankfully, once we got to our destination I was able to park the car and sleep extensively.)

I love the motorways, though. Soooo familiar.

Offline physicskate

  • *
  • Posts: 622
  • Joined: Oct 2012
  • Location: York
  • Gender: Female
  • Liked: 50
Re: Oh, jolly.... driving stuff
« Reply #19 on: January 19, 2017, 07:00:59 PM »
I second the getting lessons. I had 20 hours in an automatic, had a heck of a time finding an instructor! Not many 'do' automatic. I just wanted my automatic license... too many new tricks to learn otherwise! I paid £30 an hour (but got some discount for block booking, can't remember how much). Had been here (UK) 10 years at that point but not driven.

I am from California - the test there was an absolute joke!!! You actually need to know how to drive here!
2004-2008: Student Visa
2008-2010: Tier 1 PSW
2010-2011: Tier 4
2011-2014: Tier 2
2013-2016: New Tier 2 (changed jobs)
16/12/15: SET (LR) successful! - It's been a long road...
12/05/16: Citizenship ceremony!

Online ksand24

  • *
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 15221
  • Joined: Jan 2007
  • Location: Lincolnshire, UK
  • Gender: Female
  • Liked: 609
Re: Oh, jolly.... driving stuff
« Reply #20 on: January 19, 2017, 07:22:37 PM »
I am from California - the test there was an absolute joke!!! You actually need to know how to drive here!

When I was studying abroad in New Mexico, I remember talking to a girl in one of my classes who said she spent a total of just 2 hours behind the wheel before she got her licence!

In comparison, when I learned to drive, on top of my 2 hours a week of lessons I probably spent about 10 hours a week practicing in my parents car as well... so I was up to about 700-800 hours behind the wheel before I got my licence :P.

Online KFdancer

  • *
  • Posts: 6755
  • Joined: Jun 2012
  • Liked: 680
Re: Oh, jolly.... driving stuff
« Reply #21 on: January 19, 2017, 07:45:22 PM »
When I was studying abroad in New Mexico, I remember talking to a girl in one of my classes who said she spent a total of just 2 hours behind the wheel before she got her licence!

In comparison, when I learned to drive, on top of my 2 hours a week of lessons I probably spent about 10 hours a week practicing in my parents car as well... so I was up to about 700-800 hours behind the wheel before I got my licence :P.

My parents made me drive everywhere from the time I turned 15.  They wanted me to get as much practice in the car with them as possible which was really good.

I think the US test is too easy (obviously varies by state) and I think the UK test is over the top.  I think both should be somewhere in the middle!

And in my experience, no one else in either country knows how to drive!   ;D

Offline Nan D.

  • *
  • Posts: 238
  • Joined: Sep 2015
  • Liked: 22
Re: Oh, jolly.... driving stuff
« Reply #22 on: January 19, 2017, 08:25:27 PM »


And in my experience, no one else in either country knows how to drive!   ;D

HAH. So true!

Offline Karlee

  • *
  • Posts: 301
  • Joined: Jul 2011
  • Location: Midlands
  • Gender: Female
  • Liked: 4
Re: Oh, jolly.... driving stuff
« Reply #23 on: January 19, 2017, 11:17:27 PM »
Lol so true! I procrastinated on taking my driving test for a while- I was nervous to drive and my parents and sister drove me wherever I needed to go anyways. I didn't get my license until I was 17 almost 18. But I think waiting a little longer may have made me a better driver. So many of my friends who got their license just shortly after turning 16 had car accidents within months of passing their tests.

Once I got my license I finally realized how good it felt to be independent, and not carted around by mom and dad all the time.
4/2015 Married
7/29/2015 Spousal visa received

Offline Sirius

  • *
  • Posts: 1574
  • Joined: Sep 2014
  • Liked: 116
Re: Oh, jolly.... driving stuff
« Reply #24 on: January 22, 2017, 02:17:16 PM »
it's entirely possible that she won't be able to find housing near her work.


Finding a house near work is a long way off. Your daughter needs to remain dependant on you as that is what her allows her to continue to reside in the UK as a family member of an EEA citizen and she needs at least 5 years of being that (if Brexit allows). 

If she was under 21 years old for all this time then it's not so much of a problem as it is assumed they are a dependant, but she is over age 21. Getting a job and living independently, won't cut it.

It's the same for EEA citizens too when they reach age 21, they either have to prove they remain dependant on an EEA parent exercising treaty rights, or they have to exercise treaty rights themselves. The latter is not an option for your daughter as she is not an EEA citizen.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2017, 02:34:08 PM by Sirius »

Offline Sirius

  • *
  • Posts: 1574
  • Joined: Sep 2014
  • Liked: 116
Re: Oh, jolly.... driving stuff
« Reply #25 on: January 22, 2017, 02:56:38 PM »

I've had my UK licence since 2012 and I have only used it once in the UK - to rent a van when we moved. We live in London, so we use public transportation and walk. We don't have a car in the UK and don't have plans to buy a car, but it's nice to have my licence.

Passing and then not driving, means you will not be caught out by the

"Your licence will be revoked if you get 6 or more points within 2 years of passing your test."
https://www.gov.uk/penalty-points-endorsements/new-drivers



« Last Edit: January 22, 2017, 03:00:49 PM by Sirius »

Online eatoomey

  • *
  • Posts: 258
  • Joined: Oct 2010
  • Location: Scotland
  • Gender: Female
  • Liked: 15
Re: Oh, jolly.... driving stuff
« Reply #26 on: January 22, 2017, 03:21:42 PM »
HAH. So true!
Woah! Couldn't disagree more! Whenever I go back to the states I'm absolutely gobsmacked by how poorly everyone drives. Like, actually physically scared at times. I always breathe a sigh of relief when I get back to the UK.
Sept 2001 - June 2006: studied at the University of Glasgow and the University of Strathclyde
Aug 2010 - Dec 2010: in UK on holiday visa
Jan 2011: issued fiancée visa
July 2011: issued FLR(M)
March 2012: DD1
June 2013: issued ILR
November 2013: DD2

Offline Aquila

  • *
  • Posts: 2252
  • Joined: Feb 2010
  • Location: London
  • Liked: 21
Re: Oh, jolly.... driving stuff
« Reply #27 on: January 22, 2017, 03:23:48 PM »
To add to the general consensus here, yes, in my experience, passing the UK driving test is much different to passing the US driving test.  I've needed two attempts to pass the theory test, and I failed my first practical test with one fault (even one major fault will automatically fail you, even if it's due to external factors, like another driver behind you doing something really stupid, causing you to deviate from the exacting test standards).  I'm trying again next month, and hoping I'll pass second time.  I've spent a good £1000 at least on lessons and test bookings.  While I won't say it's impossible to pass the UK driving test after one or two lessons, I think it would be quite difficult to do.  I had 10+ years of US driving experience, but passing the test is less about experience and more about knowing how to drive exactly as the examiners want you to drive.  I've heard the UK driving test is rather high up on the list of hardest driving tests in the world; only a handful of countries have more difficult standards.
Met DH 2004 | Engaged 2009 | Married, got a spouse visa, and moved to UK 2010 | KOL passed 2011 | ILR 2012 | UK citizenship 2015

Offline TravelingFrog

  • Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 2189
  • Joined: Jun 2012
  • Location: London
  • Gender: Female
  • Liked: 84
Re: Oh, jolly.... driving stuff
« Reply #28 on: January 22, 2017, 04:22:44 PM »
I've had my UK licence since 2012 and I have only used it once in the UK - to rent a van when we moved. We live in London, so we use public transportation and walk. We don't have a car in the UK and don't have plans to buy a car, but it's nice to have my licence. Plus, they're never going to make the rules easier or cheaper, so might as well get in early!
Passing and then not driving, means you will not be caught out by the

"Your licence will be revoked if you get 6 or more points within 2 years of passing your test."
https://www.gov.uk/penalty-points-endorsements/new-drivers

That's definitely a plus. I'd forgotten that was one of my bonus selling points when convincing DH deciding that I should start taking lessons just a few months after I arrived even though we had no car and no need for a car.

It also helps pass the time when I'd be considered a 'new driver' for insurance. Never mind the fact I've not driven much in the UK, that means I've had no points and I've had my licence for well over 3 years now. 8)

There was also talk of a graduated licence-type thing similar to what they have in some states that restricts when you can drive a who can ride with you as a new driver. I don't think anything came of that, but it's nice to know I won't have to worry about that as a grown adult. ::)
July 2012 - Fiancée Visa | Nov 2012 - Married
Dec 2012 - FLR | Nov 2014 - ILR | Dec 2015 - UK Citizen

Offline Nan D.

  • *
  • Posts: 238
  • Joined: Sep 2015
  • Liked: 22
Re: Oh, jolly.... driving stuff
« Reply #29 on: January 22, 2017, 04:50:35 PM »

Finding a house near work is a long way off. Your daughter needs to remain dependant on you as that is what her allows her to continue to reside in the UK as a family member of an EEA citizen and she needs at least 5 years of being that (if Brexit allows). 

If she was under 21 years old for all this time then it's not so much of a problem as it is assumed they are a dependant, but she is over age 21. Getting a job and living independently, won't cut it.

It's the same for EEA citizens too when they reach age 21, they either have to prove they remain dependant on an EEA parent exercising treaty rights, or they have to exercise treaty rights themselves. The latter is not an option for your daughter as she is not an EEA citizen.

We know, Sirius, we know.  ;)  But thanks for reminding us anyway.

Grad school may possibly last almost that long. The master's program is only one year. But there's a real possibility of her going on for a PhD, potentially. In her field, working means doing bits of contract work here and there, until one is established, if she doesn't go into academia. She'd need to be able to get to those places.  If she goes the professorial route, I would assume the institution would deal with immigration paperwork - IF the institution that hopefully hires her is even in the UK.  We'll be in the same household long past the 5 year mark, I'm assuming. If that even applies at that point. There's always the possibility that they will ask us to leave when Brexit becomes final.

To get the license now would mean not having to deal with it later, one less thing.