Author Topic: Do I still have to employ British people if I want to start my own business?  (Read 367 times)

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Offline akajezebel

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There used to be a post on here called "Starting or Running Your Own Business" (http://www.uk-yankee.com/wiki-manual/index.php/finances/self-employment) but it doesn't exist anymore. I want to say that this is where I read that as a US citizen, you had to employ British people if you wanted to start your own business in this country. Is that still the case? I read another thread by Stephanie303 (I think) that said she started her own cleaning business, but I'm wondering if that's legal...

I have ILR and have lived in this country since Christmas of 2007. I was married to a Brit when I moved here and we've since divorced. I live here with my daughter who has dual citizenship.

I want to work for myself as a web developer / UX designer, but don't want to have to employ anyone as I'm just starting out. Anyone know where I can find a definitive answer on this?

Offline jimbocz

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Do I still have to employ British people if I want to start my own business?
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2017, 10:15:45 AM »
I've had my own IT contracting business for 13 years and have never employed anyone but myself.  I am almost certain that any company you form will have exactly the same rules for hiring as any other similar British company.  That includes not hiring anyone if you want.

You will need to hire an accountant to help you start your new company and they can answer these type of questions for you. 

For more information on this type of thing, go to the forum at contractoruk
« Last Edit: February 13, 2017, 10:17:28 AM by jimbocz »

Offline x0Kiss0fDeath

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Not starting my own business and also don't have an answer for you, but I wanted to comment so I can see replies as I am actually curious about this... That seems like a really difficult rule to enforce as I feel like people would be able to claim discrimination or something and I know that's quite a sensitive topic.

Offline KFdancer

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That rule is for people who want a visa to move to the UK to start a business - not for those already living and working in the UK on a visa.

Offline hms_seahorse

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There used to be a post on here called "Starting or Running Your Own Business" (http://www.uk-yankee.com/wiki-manual/index.php/finances/self-employment) but it doesn't exist anymore. I want to say that this is where I read that as a US citizen, you had to employ British people if you wanted to start your own business in this country. Is that still the case? I read another thread by Stephanie303 (I think) that said she started her own cleaning business, but I'm wondering if that's legal...

I have ILR and have lived in this country since Christmas of 2007. I was married to a Brit when I moved here and we've since divorced. I live here with my daughter who has dual citizenship.

I want to work for myself as a web developer / UX designer, but don't want to have to employ anyone as I'm just starting out. Anyone know where I can find a definitive answer on this?

Everything KFDancer and jimbocz told you is true.

Keep in mind that you don't ::need:: to start a limited company to be self-employed. You can also register with HMRC as a sole trader. There are advantages and disadvantages to both models, depending on your situation, services, expenses, desires, etc etc.

Either way, I would recommend speaking to an accountant to determine which self-employment route (limited company or sole trader) is most advantageous to you. It's a particularly good time of year to do so, if you want to start with the new tax year and make that part of business life slightly easier for yourself.

Offline Sirius

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That seems like a really difficult rule to enforce as I feel like people would be able to claim discrimination or something and I know that's quite a sensitive topic.

Switzerland have just been told by the EU that they can do this because of the problems free movement causes: Swiss citizens for jobs before anyone else. Another EEA country is allowed to limit the number of those using free movement and they must have a job offered before they are allowed to enter. Even those that have a job are refused entry if the cap has been met.

Before the UK joined the EU, we used to have all sorts of rules to favour Brits for jobs and services and in some ways we still do. i.e. Look how easy it is for the UK to remove citizenship from someone who has naturalised as a Brit. Australia have just brought in some new rules to favour their citizens for jobs over immigrants. etc
« Last Edit: February 13, 2017, 05:40:52 PM by Sirius »

Offline x0Kiss0fDeath

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Switzerland have just been told by the EU that they can do this because of the problems free movement causes: Swiss citizens for jobs before anyone else. Another EEA country is allowed to limit the number of those using free movement and they must have a job offered before they are allowed to enter. Even those that have a job are refused entry if the cap has been met.

Before the UK joined the EU, we used to have all sorts of rules to favour Brits for jobs and services and in some ways we still do. i.e. Look how easy it is for the UK to remove citizenship from someone who has naturalised as a Brit. Australia have just brought in some new rules to favour their citizens for jobs over immigrants. etc

I get the whole idea of the citizens being first before somebody who's applying outside the country, but surely they couldn't say to a person who immigrated to Switzerland for a spouse (for example) vs a job "sorry we can't hire you as we can only hire Swiss people"? Just seems weird to me I guess


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Offline sonofasailor

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Switzerland have just been told by the EU that they can do this because of the problems free movement causes: Swiss citizens for jobs before anyone else.

No.

 It is still playing out. It looks like what will emerge is that vacancies will be required to be advertised in local job agencies first. The EU has stated they will be monitoring to insure that no discrimination against EU citizens takes place.
Build your opponent a golden bridge to retreat across - Sun Tzu