Author Topic: Setting up NHS when moving  (Read 225 times)

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Offline John5

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Setting up NHS when moving
« on: December 14, 2017, 08:41:30 PM »
Do I need a travel policy for the first few months if I move to the UK?  I am a dual US/UK citizen.  It says I should be covered from day one in theory.  But it will take a few months to get proof of residence, utility bills, tax bills, bank statements, etc.  If something happens before I can prove ordinary residence they might demand payment up front.  Seems like no cut and dried way to prove being "ordinarily resident" exists.

Offline ksand24

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Re: Setting up NHS when moving
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2017, 08:53:08 PM »
If you are a dual UK/US citizen and are returning to live permanently in the UK, you will be entitled to NHS care from day one and do not need health insurance.

You should be able to use emergency or walk-in services immediately, but in order to fully register with an NHS GP, you'll need proof of UK address... however, you should still be able to get treatment as a temporary patient if you need it before you can provide proof of address.

It won't take a few months to get proof of residence though... you just call the local council or utility companies, get your name added to the accounts and then wait until you receive a letter in the mail with your name and address on it... shouldn't take more than 1-2 weeks, maybe a month or so.

Considering that the NHS receptionists are not used to charging anyone anything and usually have to be hounded to give you a bill, it's unlikely they will try to demand payment.... they are more likely to insist that you don't have to pay, even if you know you do have to pay (but if you are a UK citizen and have moved permanently to the UK, you won't need to pay anyway).

Offline durhamlad

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Re: Setting up NHS when moving
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2017, 10:11:18 PM »
If you are a dual UK/US citizen and are returning to live permanently in the UK, you will be entitled to NHS care from day one and do not need health insurance.

You should be able to use emergency or walk-in services immediately, but in order to fully register with an NHS GP, you'll need proof of UK address... however, you should still be able to get treatment as a temporary patient if you need it before you can provide proof of address.

It won't take a few months to get proof of residence though... you just call the local council or utility companies, get your name added to the accounts and then wait until you receive a letter in the mail with your name and address on it... shouldn't take more than 1-2 weeks, maybe a month or so.

Considering that the NHS receptionists are not used to charging anyone anything and usually have to be hounded to give you a bill, it's unlikely they will try to demand payment.... they are more likely to insist that you don't have to pay, even if you know you do have to pay (but if you are a UK citizen and have moved permanently to the UK, you won't need to pay anyway).

+1

Definitely don’t need any extra insurance. Our son just moved back and when he registered at our local surgery he simply gave our address as that is where is was staying. (He just got his own place yesterday after living with us for 3 months). He wasn’t asked for proof that he was living there or even for his NI number as he didn’t have one at that point.
Adventure before dementia

Offline larrabee

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Re: Setting up NHS when moving
« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2017, 04:43:28 AM »
Do I need a travel policy for the first few months if I move to the UK?  I am a dual US/UK citizen.  It says I should be covered from day one in theory.  But it will take a few months to get proof of residence, utility bills, tax bills, bank statements, etc.  If something happens before I can prove ordinary residence they might demand payment up front.  Seems like no cut and dried way to prove being "ordinarily resident" exists.

As the others have said, all you need to do is move to the UK with the intention of staying. It's not the same at all as determining ordinary residence for HMRC for example!
March 29th 2013-Moved to UK, husband on spouse visa.Oct 20th 2015-Applied by mail for FLR(M).Feb 1st 2016 FLR(M).