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Topic: How to Take the Bus  (Read 20728 times)

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Re: How to Take the Bus
« Reply #30 on: May 06, 2008, 03:14:32 PM »
British person (and bus user) here:

Sticking your hand out is absolutely the way to go, no need for special 'flicks of the wrist' or anything.  Just a hand out (it may be worth while keeping your hand out until the bus starts to slow to make sure the driver has seen you.)

The 'pointing' guy was just a fool, such as exist everywhere.


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Re: How to Take the Bus
« Reply #31 on: October 01, 2008, 01:25:21 AM »
There may be slight regional differences to some of Mindy's excellent instructions...
 
On buses, you dont generally buy a return ticket...

I rang the bell once, and the driver screamed at me and told me i could have caused an RTA!  ::)
.


I'm so glad to know this! Hubby and I have been wondering why we put all our money in the bin ask for a round trip and are issued a single ticket. We have been charged more and less depending on the driver and are terribly confused why no one issues round trips. Guess its simple that we should just purchase one way, in the states round trip was slightly cheaper.

Also I'm glad they dont push the button all the time, we were on the bus the other day and a elderly person pushed it..i nearly peed my pants it was soo loud!


Re: How to Take the Bus
« Reply #32 on: October 01, 2008, 05:47:07 AM »
I'm so glad to know this! Hubby and I have been wondering why we put all our money in the bin ask for a round trip and are issued a single ticket. We have been charged more and less depending on the driver and are terribly confused why no one issues round trips. Guess its simple that we should just purchase one way, in the states round trip was slightly cheaper.

Also I'm glad they dont push the button all the time, we were on the bus the other day and a elderly person pushed it..i nearly peed my pants it was soo loud!

In Glasgow, you can buy a 'Day Ticket' on the bus, which is (obviously) good for multiple trips all day.  Just say 'day ticket' to the driver, and you'll just be issued the long paper ticket as normal, but it will have 'day ticket' printed on it.  That's really the only form of 'return' ticket you can get in Glasgow.   Oh, i'd better add, that's for First buses... i dont know what they do on the Arriva buses.

Also, in some cities, like Edinburgh and (i think London, last time i was there) it's a flat fare, no matter if you're going just one stop or all the way across town.  In Glasgow, the buses are on fare stages, so you actually have to tell the driver where you are going (you dont need to bother saying 'single to', cos it's always a single--- just say 'Paisley Road Toll, please, or Kelvinbridge subway' or wherever it is you're going... if it's vague, they will ask you to be more specific), and he will then tell you how much the fare is.   
But the Day Ticket makes that so much easier (and cheaper if you are doing more than 2 journeys).   With the day ticket, you don't have to say where you are going, you just clearly display the ticket to the driver, and board.

Some of the Glasgow folk can advise if the info i've given you is not correct.... when im in Glasgow, i usually just buy a single, so have not bought a day ticket in Glasgow for a couple of years.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2008, 05:50:11 AM by Quarter-Gill »


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Re: How to Take the Bus
« Reply #33 on: October 01, 2008, 08:54:22 AM »
And in West Yorkshire, the First buses' day ticket is called 'First Day'...but to further confuse things, that's actually the new (bus company's) terminology.  Anyone who's been lived around here for awhile calls it a 'Day Rider' - it's a way one can spot a local or someone who's new.  ;)

And yes, here as well you tell the driver where you're going & then find out the fare of the ticket.  But sometimes people just ask for £1.60 or whatever - usually if they are regular riders.  Sometimes the bus drivers allow that, and sometimes they don't.
Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack, a crack in everything
That's how the light gets in...

- from Anthem, by Leonard Cohen (b 1934)


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Re: How to Take the Bus
« Reply #34 on: October 01, 2008, 10:20:07 AM »
And in West Yorkshire, the First buses' day ticket is called 'First Day'...but to further confuse things, that's actually the new (bus company's) terminology.  Anyone who's been lived around here for awhile calls it a 'Day Rider' - it's a way one can spot a local or someone who's new.  ;)
But then there's another type of day ticket that works for all the bus companies. We got burned by that one trying to go to Ikea, because we didn't know that the bus to Ikea was a different company. ::)


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Re: How to Take the Bus
« Reply #35 on: October 01, 2008, 10:23:18 AM »
But then there's another type of day ticket that works for all the bus companies. We got burned by that one trying to go to Ikea, because we didn't know that the bus to Ikea was a different company. ::)

Yep, we have that in South Yorkshire too- since I take 2 buses to get to work every day that's the one I buy.  It's so nice being able just to show my pass to any bus driver (or tram conductor) and go wherever I want in the city!
Now a triple citizen!

Student visa 9/06-->Int'l Grad Scheme 1/08-->FLR(M) 7/08-->ILR 6/10-->British citizenship 12/12


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Re: How to Take the Bus
« Reply #36 on: October 01, 2008, 10:25:53 AM »
But then there's another type of day ticket that works for all the bus companies. We got burned by that one trying to go to Ikea, because we didn't know that the bus to Ikea was a different company. ::)

I knew about Metro Card but do they sell that by the day ticket?  Didn't know that.  I got burned before when I had to take my Life in the US test down in Hunslet, I had a First Bus ticket, and it was only Arriva buses down there.
Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack, a crack in everything
That's how the light gets in...

- from Anthem, by Leonard Cohen (b 1934)


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Re: How to Take the Bus
« Reply #37 on: November 26, 2008, 02:33:19 PM »
I just moved to Manchester,and my first time catching the bus,it took two buses driving right past me(and I was in CLEAR view) to finally think to signal the next bus,which then stopped.I'm from Bermuda,and there the bus will stop if the driver sees you standing at the bus-stop,no flagging or sticking out your hand needed.I smile when I think of it now,the things that happen adapting to a new culture ;D


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Re: How to Take the Bus
« Reply #38 on: November 26, 2008, 02:42:54 PM »
I just moved to Manchester,and my first time catching the bus,it took two buses driving right past me(and I was in CLEAR view) to finally think to signal the next bus,which then stopped.I'm from Bermuda,and there the bus will stop if the driver sees you standing at the bus-stop,no flagging or sticking out your hand needed.I smile when I think of it now,the things that happen adapting to a new culture ;D

It can often depend on where you get the bus from - if you are standing at a bus stop in a small town or village which has only one bus service, then chances are the bus will stop for you without you signalling. However, in larger towns and cities, there maybe several bus services, which travel various routes around the city, that stop at the same stop, so the driver will not know if you want to get on his bus unless you signal. For example, the bus stop I stand on to go to work in the morning is the same for the number 1, 8, 9, 40, 41, 54 and X14 bus services. If I don't signal when the right one comes along, then all the buses will drive right past me, assuming that I'm waiting for a different bus!


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Re: How to Take the Bus
« Reply #39 on: November 26, 2008, 04:19:07 PM »
I always intentionally step back away from the curb and look away if I see that the bus that's coming isn't the bus I want.

So I don't cause the bus driver to stop unnecessarily.


Re: How to Take the Bus
« Reply #40 on: November 26, 2008, 09:38:45 PM »
[mod notes]

Let's keep on topic in the 'Just Do It' board.

Thanks


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Re: How to Take the Bus
« Reply #41 on: November 27, 2008, 04:51:09 PM »
Did I miss something?


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Re: How to Take the Bus
« Reply #42 on: November 27, 2008, 04:54:30 PM »
Did I miss something?

There were a couple more posts above Mindy's, but they have been deleted since.


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Re: How to Take the Bus
« Reply #43 on: November 27, 2008, 10:41:29 PM »
It can often depend on where you get the bus from - if you are standing at a bus stop in a small town or village which has only one bus service, then chances are the bus will stop for you without you signalling. However, in larger towns and cities, there maybe several bus services, which travel various routes around the city, that stop at the same stop, so the driver will not know if you want to get on his bus unless you signal. For example, the bus stop I stand on to go to work in the morning is the same for the number 1, 8, 9, 40, 41, 54 and X14 bus services. If I don't signal when the right one comes along, then all the buses will drive right past me, assuming that I'm waiting for a different bus!

Yeah I see the logic in what you're saying. From what I've noticed,I have to signal the bus to stop even in small village areas/towns where I live.But it's because of the reasons you described.


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Re: How to Take the Bus
« Reply #44 on: November 27, 2008, 11:59:19 PM »
In the first post of this thread, Mindy mentioned keeping train tickets handy after you board the train, which made me think of two other reasons to keep your ticket:

1. Occasionally on the London Underground (aka "the tube" or "subway") inspectors from Transport for London will come through train cars and want to see proof that you've paid a fare.  You can either show them your ticket, or if you're using an Oyster card they can scan it to check. 

Sometimes they do these checks in stations after you've gotten off the train, but before you've left the area where tickets or Oyster card validation are required.  At Finsbury Park, for example, they stand at the top of the stairs and check everyone as they come up after getting off the train.

2. On trains (and on the tube) you may need to use your ticket to get through the exit gates at your destination.

These seem like little things, but if you're used to someplace like New York, where once you've used a Metrocard you don't need it again, it's something to be aware of.

Carl

p.s. Assuming New York still uses Metrocards.  I haven't been back in a while.  :)



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