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Topic: Cooking in the UK  (Read 33626 times)

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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #15 on: May 17, 2007, 11:44:26 AM »
A pound (four US sticks) of butter is 454 g.  Butter here is generally sold in 250g blocks, so just a little over half a pound.  That's where I start with my butter conversions.   :)


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  • Odd Duck
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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #16 on: May 17, 2007, 04:02:35 PM »
I think for a lot of U.S. recipes work better with strong four, rather than plain, because of the gluten levels.  So I use strong flour for my cookies.  But that might be just me. 

I haven't tried using strong flour for US cookies/quick breads etc, because I think the lower gluten content actually works better. I did notice, however, that I seemed to need more flour than the recipe called for. And then one day my office mate brought in a cookbook so I could copy a recipe and I happened to notice that it had conversion charts in the back, and it actually said that you need more UK flour than North American. I bought a copy of the book, so when I get a chance (probably next week) I'll type in the chart.


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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #17 on: May 19, 2007, 03:46:36 PM »
US baking powder is 'double acting' too, which means if you are using UK baking powder, you should double it for a US recipe.
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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #18 on: May 20, 2007, 09:47:05 PM »
Wow, Chary, this is great! I know I'll go back to this thread many times.


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  • Odd Duck
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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #19 on: May 24, 2007, 08:29:40 AM »
Here are the flour conversions I promised. If anyone's interested, the book I took this from is called "Muffins Fast and Fantastic," by Susan Reimer. The author is a Canadian living in the UK, so she has a pretty good idea what she's talking about. It's a great book.

10 oz (280 g) plain flour = 2 1/4 cups. Substitute 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour.
9 oz (255 g) plain flour = 2  cups. Substitute 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour.
8 oz (225 g) plain flour = 1 3/4 cups. Substitute 1 1/3 cups all-purpose flour.
7 oz (200 g) plain flour = 1 1/2 cups. Substitute 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour.
6 oz (170 g) plain flour = 1 1/4 cups. Substitute 1 cup all-purpose flour.
5 oz (140 g) plain flour = 1 cup + 2 Tbsp. Substitute 7/8 cup all-purpose flour.

US baking powder is 'double acting' too, which means if you are using UK baking powder, you should double it for a US recipe.
I'm not so sure about this. From the food dictionary at Epicurious:
"There are three basic kinds of baking powder. The most common is double-acting, which releases some gas when it becomes wet and the rest when exposed to oven heat. Single-acting tartrate and phosphate baking powders (hard to find in most American markets because of the popularity of double-acting baking powder) release their gases as soon as they're moistened."

I haven't noticed any problems with using the same amount of UK baking powder as I would of US. When I was using the right amount of flour, that is!  ;)


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    • The Two Crabs
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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #20 on: June 02, 2007, 05:46:26 PM »
Chary, that was an absolutely brilliant post, especially the glossary of British vs. American terms. Thank yoU!
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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #21 on: June 02, 2007, 06:09:25 PM »
Very very useful thread!! Thanks Chary. NOW maybe after all these years in the UK I will finally be able to cook something properly!


Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #22 on: November 25, 2007, 10:42:21 AM »
And don't forget to get a set of scales!!  :)


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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #23 on: November 25, 2007, 10:46:05 AM »
And don't forget to get a set of scales!!  :)

Na she doesn't need scales. I just use a tablespoon (= 1oz/25g) for everything or a measuring jug.


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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #24 on: November 25, 2007, 10:51:15 AM »
And don't forget to get a set of scales!!  :)

Another option is to buy some kitchen scales which measure in both ounces and grams. You don’t have to spend a fortune - most supermarkets sell cheap scales which will serve your needs. Of course, you can spend more and buy from a cooking shop, but it’s not necessary.

Ahem ... chopped liver?!?!  ;) :P
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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #25 on: November 25, 2007, 11:12:01 AM »
Na she doesn't need scales. I just use a tablespoon (= 1oz/25g) for everything or a measuring jug.
You mean I have to do math as well??  :o

I have American measuring spoons by the way. Are they close enough to the European ones?


Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #26 on: November 25, 2007, 11:24:34 AM »
Ahem ... chopped liver?!?!  ;) :P

It was just a reminder!


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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #27 on: November 25, 2007, 11:25:11 AM »
I have American measuring spoons by the way. Are they close enough to the European ones?

Use Gourmet Sleuth for any conversions.

A US teaspoon of sugar, for instance, will be equal to 1.39 UK teaspoons. Not a huge difference, but obviously it can add up if you're using a lot of something.

Seriously, R, read the thread!!!!!

It was just a reminder!

Just kidding!
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  • Witchiepoo
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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #28 on: November 25, 2007, 12:05:16 PM »
I have a full set of US/UK dry and liquid measures as well as measuring spoons for both countries.  I don't worry much about the difference between the two when cooking, but in baking I'm a bit more precise.
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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #29 on: November 25, 2007, 02:57:56 PM »
My US measuring spoons and cups have the metric on it as well. The US measurements are in big print and the metric is underneath in the small print. Not all measuring cups and spoons come with both though.

I actually have two sets of US measuring cups and three sets of measuring spoons (long story on the spoons) but the two sets of measuring cups are different sizes. The 1 cup for one set is larger than the other. Not by much, but it is strange.


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