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Topic: Cooking in the UK  (Read 33668 times)

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  • Jewlz
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Re: finding tofu, miso and soy products
« Reply #45 on: May 17, 2010, 10:12:03 PM »
I've generally been amazed by how much better quality supermarket food is here in the UK than in the US.  One thing that puzzles me however is how difficult it is to find tofu and how expensive it is when I do find it.  Vegetarianism isn't rare here.  Why don't Brits eat tofu?

I like the Cauldron marinated tofu, but I guess I haven't seen too many other kinds here. I'll bet Tesco has some different kinds available online for home delivery.


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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #46 on: May 17, 2010, 10:21:50 PM »
Perhaps it's because other meat-free options are so readily available? The major supermarkets all have own-brand vegetarian burgers, sausages, etc., as well as the branded stuff, and of course there is the wonderful Quorn. We're not vegetarians, but most weeks my partner and I eat Quorn products at least twice. We used to eat tofu (around here we can find it in Tesco and Morrison's) but it was so much more work! You don't mention where you are, but it could be regional; I live near a university, so we tend to get stuff like that quite easily in the supermarkets, and I imagine most decent-sized cities will have them too.
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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #47 on: May 18, 2010, 09:11:19 AM »
I eat tofu and miso, which are easily available in the larger supermarkets in larger cities, but I find things like quinoa and bulghur wheat take that little extra journey if you want them, like to a health food shop.


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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #48 on: May 18, 2010, 09:16:40 AM »
I've always found bulgur wheat very easily in the Tesco whole foods range.
Arrived as student 9/2003; Renewed student visa 9/2006; Applied for HSMP approval 1/2008; HSMP approved 3/2008; Tier 1 General FLR received 4/2008; FLR(M) Unmarried partner approved (in-person) 27/8/2009; ILR granted at in-person PEO appointment 1/8/2011; Applied for citizenship at Edinburgh NCS 31/10/2011; Citizenship approval received 4/2/2012
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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #49 on: May 18, 2010, 09:36:50 AM »
I've always found bulgur wheat very easily in the Tesco whole foods range.

For some reason, it doesn't seem to be carried online for me.   


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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #50 on: May 18, 2010, 09:37:44 AM »
I've seen bulgur wheat and quinoa with the gourmet and free from foods at our local Sainsburys. Along with miso soups and some other things. Expensive, though!


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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #51 on: May 18, 2010, 10:21:44 AM »
I've seen bulgur wheat and quinoa with the gourmet and free from foods at our local Sainsburys. Along with miso soups and some other things. Expensive, though!
The tiny health food store in my neighborhood sells quinoa, tofu, bulgur, miso.  It hurts to see quinoa and other grains in these small packages priced up as if it were gold dust.  I'm used to buying it in bulk out of huge bins and it was cheap!
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  • Jewlz
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Re: Cooking in the UK
« Reply #52 on: May 18, 2010, 12:44:28 PM »
Marlespo, why'd you move this back to this board? I'm so confused.  ??? I was hoping it could be a sticky topic under Food Talk so it could be easily found. It's been a great resource for me.  ;D


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