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Topic: The BBC and Mareeeeland  (Read 963 times)

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The BBC and Mareeeeland
« on: August 17, 2016, 10:48:34 AM »
I've noticed that the Beeb always pronounced it Mareeeeland rather than Maruland.   Why?  I've never heard it pronounced like that anywhere in the states.  I could be wrong, do Northerners say it like that?

It's been bugging me.


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Re: The BBC and Mareeeeland
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2016, 11:00:12 AM »
I've noticed that the Beeb always pronounced it Mareeeeland rather than Maruland.   Why?  I've never heard it pronounced like that anywhere in the states.  I could be wrong, do Northerners say it like that?

It's been bugging me.
Oh, are you talking about Maryland? I'm from Minnesota and I say it Mare-(upsidedown e)-lind. As a kid I assumed it was said Mare-ee-land, but that was because I never heard anyone say it!

I also had no idea how to say Arkansas. I knew Kansas (kan-sis) and assumed it was the same. As do most Brits! haha. I didn't learn to say Arkansas (are-kin-saw) right until I was 10 and was learning the states and capitals.
The usual. American girl meets British guy. They fall into like, then into love. Then there was the big decision. The American traveled across the pond to join the Brit. And life was never the same again.


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Re: The BBC and Mareeeeland
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2016, 11:29:21 AM »
I just have to add, that calling the BBC 'the Beeb', confused me for a moment as I know that's similar to what his fans call Beiber. haha.
The usual. American girl meets British guy. They fall into like, then into love. Then there was the big decision. The American traveled across the pond to join the Brit. And life was never the same again.


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Re: The BBC and Mareeeeland
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2016, 11:34:45 AM »
Oh, are you talking about Maryland? I'm from Minnesota and I say it Mare-(upsidedown e)-lind. As a kid I assumed it was said Mare-ee-land, but that was because I never heard anyone say it!

I also had no idea how to say Arkansas. I knew Kansas (kan-sis) and assumed it was the same. As do most Brits! haha. I didn't learn to say Arkansas (are-kin-saw) right until I was 10 and was learning the states and capitals.
I know that lots of people say Arkansas different ways but I thought everybody agreed on how to say Maryland.  I'm not entirely convinced that we are saying it the same way.  I don't remember how the upside e is pronounced.


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Re: The BBC and Mareeeeland
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2016, 11:58:14 AM »
It's a schwa and this get's it right for the sound.

http://rachelsenglish.com/english-pronounce-schwa/

I had to learn the international phonetic alphabet when I took a dialects class in college.

So it's kind of like MARE-schwa-lind, with a rather soft d. It sounds a lot like how I say the name Marilyn. But I know a lot of people say that name differently...

The usual. American girl meets British guy. They fall into like, then into love. Then there was the big decision. The American traveled across the pond to join the Brit. And life was never the same again.


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Re: The BBC and Mareeeeland
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2016, 04:12:08 PM »
That's it, it's a schwa.

Thanks for the link, that was a bit surreal.

Anyway, why does the BBC pronounce it so weirdly?  They must have made a conscious decision because they are consistent


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Re: The BBC and Mareeeeland
« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2016, 11:18:05 AM »
Probably just pronouncing it the way it looks, which is ironic considering there are places here like "Reading", "Derby", "Warwick" and many, many others :-P


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Re: The BBC and Mareeeeland
« Reply #7 on: August 19, 2016, 11:45:39 AM »
The same reason people here pronounce Michigan "Mitch-i-gan." Drives me crazy.

A few weeks after I moved here, something newsworthy happened in Binghamton, NY, and British people were all over the news calling it bing-HAM-ton. I said to my husband, you (collective British you) don't get to make fun of Americans who can't say Gloucester when you do the same thing.
On s'envolera du même quai
Les yeux dans les mêmes reflets,
Pour cette vie et celle d'après
Tu seras mon unique projet.

Je t'aimais, je t'aime, et je t'aimerai.

--Francis Cabrel


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Re: The BBC and Mareeeeland
« Reply #8 on: August 19, 2016, 01:21:23 PM »
It's a minefield!  ;D
March 28th 2013-Moved to UK, husband on spouse visa.Oct 20th 2015-Applied by mail for FLR(M).Feb 1st 2016 FLR(M).March 7th 2018 ILR. YAY! March 21st NCS&JCAP appointment.


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Re: The BBC and Mareeeeland
« Reply #9 on: August 19, 2016, 02:43:24 PM »
The same reason people here pronounce Michigan "Mitch-i-gan." Drives me crazy.

And Houston as "Hoo-ston"! Arghhh!


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Re: The BBC and Mareeeeland
« Reply #10 on: August 19, 2016, 03:30:32 PM »
I Googled this and found out that I'm not the only one to notice and the answer is long and boring.   People really want to talk a lot about BBC pronunciation.  The short answer is that the British tend to say things more Englishized and the Americans at least try to preserve the sounds of the local language.  Not sure what that has to do with Maryland but I got bored. 


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Re: The BBC and Mareeeeland
« Reply #11 on: September 02, 2016, 04:14:57 PM »
The same reason people here pronounce Michigan "Mitch-i-gan." Drives me crazy.

A few weeks after I moved here, something newsworthy happened in Binghamton, NY, and British people were all over the news calling it bing-HAM-ton. I said to my husband, you (collective British you) don't get to make fun of Americans who can't say Gloucester when you do the same thing.

I'm from Houston (HEW-STON, it is what it is but definitely not House-ton) and I had no idea that Binghamton isn't pronounced "Bing-HAM-ton"! How is it pronounced?


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Re: The BBC and Mareeeeland
« Reply #12 on: September 02, 2016, 04:24:51 PM »
Never ask a Brit to say Nicaragua....


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Re: The BBC and Mareeeeland
« Reply #13 on: September 02, 2016, 04:32:28 PM »
Never ask a Brit to say Nicaragua....

Or jaguar. Or puma. *shudder* Those are nails on a chalkboard for me.

(accidentally quoted KFDancer twice)
« Last Edit: September 02, 2016, 04:36:38 PM by lyonaria »
The usual. American girl meets British guy. They fall into like, then into love. Then there was the big decision. The American traveled across the pond to join the Brit. And life was never the same again.


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Re: The BBC and Mareeeeland
« Reply #14 on: September 02, 2016, 06:05:39 PM »
I'm from Houston (HEW-STON, it is what it is but definitely not House-ton) and I had no idea that Binghamton isn't pronounced "Bing-HAM-ton"! How is it pronounced?

BING-um-tun. Which is in keeping with how Brits pronounce things like Gloucester and Norfolk, omitting sounds you would expect to hear and inserting the schwa in at every opportunity.

On s'envolera du même quai
Les yeux dans les mêmes reflets,
Pour cette vie et celle d'après
Tu seras mon unique projet.

Je t'aimais, je t'aime, et je t'aimerai.

--Francis Cabrel


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