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Topic: Equal opportunity?  (Read 662 times)

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Equal opportunity?
« on: January 24, 2019, 12:47:17 PM »
The UK sure has a weird definition of equal opportunity. Anyone on a spousal visa who has been in the UK more than 6-9 months need not apply. From a job alert email this morning.... (can understand the citizenship/residency requirements for security clearance, but that isn't every project or department they have.)

Quote

No Eligibility: As an equal opportunities employer, we welcome applications from individuals of all backgrounds. However, in order for you to be eligible for this role, all applicants must hold a UK work permit or visa valid for a two-year period prior to applying. Unfortunately, we do not offer visa sponsorship and have no future plans to do so. For certain projects, ideally candidates will be British Nationals with a minimum of 5 years UK residency, preferably 10 years.

Job Type: Full-time



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Re: Equal opportunity?
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2019, 01:41:12 PM »
I feel like me not being a citizen is being held against me at this point lol. I keep seeing crap like this on more and more jobs. I even applied for a job at my local, tiny GP thinking surely they’ll give me at least an interview! Laughable. Thank god I don’t HAVE to work right now. We would be screwed.
UK Spouse Visa (Priority)
Applied: 21 March 2018
Biometrics: 22 March 2018
Decision email: 1 May 2018
APPROVED!!!!!
25 BD

FLR(M)
Applied: 13 January 2021
Biometrics: 10 February 2021
Emailed MP: 05 May 2021
Escalated with UKVI: 19 May 2021
Decision received: 16 June 2021!
APPROVED!!!  22 weeks since application/18 weeks since biometrics


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Re: Equal opportunity?
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2019, 01:49:10 PM »
Yeah, the only tricky bit for us is my US student loan debt. I will be out of money to pay that in 3 months, and my husband doesn't earn enough to cover our bills and that. I'm pretty screwed if I don't find something soon and can't do retail/hospitality work. Things like this make me feel really hopeless.

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Re: Equal opportunity?
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2019, 01:53:34 PM »
Yeah, the only tricky bit for us is my US student loan debt. I will be out of money to pay that in 3 months, and my husband doesn't earn enough to cover our bills and that. I'm pretty screwed if I don't find something soon and can't do retail/hospitality work. Things like this make me feel really hopeless.

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Have you considered or looked into VIP Kid?  It's teaching English to students in China. Due to the time difference, the peak time for tutoring is between 10am and 3pm our time.  I think it pays 20-ish an hour.  All done from home, over the web.  I know it's not your sector, but could be something to take the pressure off?


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Re: Equal opportunity?
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2019, 01:58:15 PM »
Have you considered or looked into VIP Kid?  It's teaching English to students in China. Due to the time difference, the peak time for tutoring is between 10am and 3pm our time.  I think it pays 20-ish an hour.  All done from home, over the web.  I know it's not your sector, but could be something to take the pressure off?
I don't have a bachelors degree. That is one of their strict requirements. (And likely a huge part of why I can't get interviews even though I have years of relevant experience.) But it may work for others on here!

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Re: Equal opportunity?
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2019, 06:51:09 PM »
Yeah, the only tricky bit for us is my US student loan debt. I will be out of money to pay that in 3 months, and my husband doesn't earn enough to cover our bills and that. I'm pretty screwed if I don't find something soon and can't do retail/hospitality work. Things like this make me feel really hopeless.

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Have you investigated the income-contingent/income-based repayment plans from the Dept. of Education? Seriously, you could be paying back very little per month, if necessary.  https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/understand/plans


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Re: Equal opportunity?
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2019, 07:27:19 PM »
Have you investigated the income-contingent/income-based repayment plans from the Dept. of Education? Seriously, you could be paying back very little per month, if necessary.  https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/understand/plans
Once I file my taxes I will be investigating this! But right now I am pretty sure I had too much income last year.

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Re: Equal opportunity?
« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2019, 10:41:44 AM »
It's for any income level. Here are some of the terms of some of the programs:

REPAYE program

Your monthly payments will be 10 percent of discretionary income.
Payments are recalculated each year and are based on your updated income and family size.
You must update your income and family size each year, even if they haven’t changed.
If you're married, both your and your spouse’s income or loan debt will be considered, whether taxes are filed jointly or separately (with limited exceptions).
Any outstanding balance on your loan will be forgiven if you haven't repaid your loan in full after 20 years (if all loans were taken out for undergraduate study) or 25 years (if any loans were taken out for graduate...


Income Based

    Your monthly payments will be either 10 or 15 percent of discretionary income (depending on when you received your first loans), but never more than you would have paid under the 10-year Standard Repayment Plan.
    Payments are recalculated each year and are based on your updated income and family size.
    You must update your income and family size each year, even if they haven’t changed.
    If you're married, your spouse's income or loan debt will be considered only if you file a joint tax return.
    Any outstanding balance on your loan will be forgiven if you haven't repaid your loan in full after 20 years or 25 years, depending on when you received your first loans.
    You may have to pay income tax on any amount that is forgiven.

Income Contingent

    Your monthly payment will be the lesser of
         20 percent of discretionary income, or
        the amount you would pay on a repayment plan with a fixed payment over 12 years, adjusted according to your income.
    Payments are recalculated each year and are based on your updated income, family size, and the total amount of your Direct Loans.
    You must update your income and family size each year, even if they haven’t changed.
    If you're married, your spouse's income or loan debt will be considered only if you file a joint tax return or you choose to repay your Direct Loans jointly with your spouse.
    Any outstanding balance will be forgiven if you haven't repaid your loan in full after 25 years.

There are other plans. You'd want to read the terms of each carefully. When you apply, you also have the option to tick a box that directs them to assign you to the program with the lowest monthly payment. They would calculate that and do so. You can change programs at any time.

Note that repayments are based on percentages of "discretionary income."  The definition of discretionary income is basically they look at the published federal poverty level (for us, overseas, I believe they use the continental US rate, not Hawaii or Alaska) and multiply by 1.5 (so, 150% of the poverty guideline level). Any income you have over that amount is considered "discretionary." For a single person in 2017 it was just over $18,000, for someone with a dependent it was in the $24,000 a year range. The student loan repayments would be calculated based on any income you had over that amount.

On most, if not all of these, you'd be hit with an IRS tax bill for the written-off amounts after the repayment period ends. However, if you are not in a financial situation to pay that bill (aka, you're technically insolvent), there are mechanisms for forgiveness of the tax debt.

It's definitely worth looking into. Also, if you are not working, you can get a hardship deferral (I think is the term) if you cannot make payments. (If you don't have income coming in, for heavens' sake, don't be making payments you don't need to be making!) If you are on the REPAYE program, the months you are not able to make a payment still count as "payments" so you remain in good standing, credit-wise.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2019, 10:44:55 AM by Nan D. »


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