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Topic: Interview Question Advice  (Read 839 times)

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Interview Question Advice
« on: February 28, 2019, 12:28:04 PM »
Hello!

So I am on the hunt for a new job, and it could transpire that I take a salary cut as most jobs I am finding in my sector are lower than what I currently make by varying degrees of severity (one as much as £7000 as it is a part-time position and I currently work full-time).

My concern is... I'm sure the "why are you willing to take such a drastic pay cut?" question is likely to come up in interview, and I really need a solid, diplomatic answer that will not allude to any problems within my current working environment (and therefore let on that I am potentially a problem employee - which I'm not!).

As I know some of have experience in being on "the other side of the table," so-to-speak, I am curious as to what kind of answer you, as an interviewer, might appreciate hearing to that question?

Thanks in advance for any advice!

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Re: Interview Question Advice
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2019, 03:39:04 PM »
Looking to improve your work/life balance!


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Re: Interview Question Advice
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2019, 04:13:20 PM »
Looking to improve your work/life balance!

That is excellent!  ;D


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Re: Interview Question Advice
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2019, 05:20:29 PM »
Looking to improve your work/life balance!
That's a good one, thanks!

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Re: Interview Question Advice
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2019, 07:57:02 AM »
Something isn't right about having to take a massive pay cut to change jobs.   If it's industry specific, then I'd widen my search to outside the industry.

It sounds like in your last (or current) job you were so important to the running of the office that they couldn't go for a few days without you.  That says to me that you'd be a great employee for any company and you shouldn't have to take a pay cut under any circumstances.  Unemployment is at an all time low, salaries in general are supposed to be going up.


You are too valuable to be paid less.

Besides, if you are still employed while looking, you can take your time to find the perfect job, and no job that pays less is perfect unless it's two blocks from your house.


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Re: Interview Question Advice
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2019, 10:21:16 AM »
Something isn't right about having to take a massive pay cut to change jobs.   If it's industry specific, then I'd widen my search to outside the industry.

It sounds like in your last (or current) job you were so important to the running of the office that they couldn't go for a few days without you.  That says to me that you'd be a great employee for any company and you shouldn't have to take a pay cut under any circumstances.  Unemployment is at an all time low, salaries in general are supposed to be going up.


You are too valuable to be paid less.

Besides, if you are still employed while looking, you can take your time to find the perfect job, and no job that pays less is perfect unless it's two blocks from your house.
This is exactly my concern - you're correct - something ISN'T right about taking a massive pay cut when looking for jobs.  However, my mental health is more important to me than my salary and therefore I would not be opposed to taking a reduced salary if it means, in the long run, I am out of this toxic environment and happier in myself.  £7,000 is obviously quite a lot of money (especially when your salary is already pennies like mine!) and I don't think I am desperate enough to take that deep of a dive, but I just want to keep as many options on the table as possible.

To be fair, many of the jobs I'm looking at are quite close to what I currently earn.  Some are even higher.  But I just want to be prepared for any possible outcomes in terms of which employers come back to be with interview offers.

Thank you for your kind words in terms of my being an invaluable employee.  At risk of sounding completely pompous, I know I am.  I am a hard worker and I am absolutely honored in knowing knowing I can be counted on by the client in terms being reliable and providing answers and assistance when requested.  I keep getting in trouble for stupid things like providing added value, so I am quickly realizing that my employer has some rather skewed priorities.

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Re: Interview Question Advice
« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2019, 02:16:05 PM »
I've only had two interviews so far, but no one has asked about my previous salary so far.  So it may not even come up.

I second the "work-life balance" idea.  That sounds perfectly diplomatic and reasonable. 

Another idea might be to say something like "I'd like to focus my skills more on (blank.)"  So... if customer service is important for the job you are applying for, maybe say you'd like to be more actively involved in customer service.  Find out what the most important aspect of the potential job is, and say you'd like to focus more on that. 

For example, years ago I taught English in Japan.  First company had me teaching children and adults, driving all over the place to give lessons, on-call 12 hours a day like a doctor.  Terrible schedule, horrible communication at the company, and no work-life balance.  Also, I HATED teaching the adults. In the interview for the new job, I didn't say any of that.  Instead, I said "I'm looking to narrow my focus to only teaching children, as I feel I excell in that area."  The new company only taught children, so that was exactly what they wanted to hear.  Find out what the new place wants, and say you are looking to focus more on that.  :) 
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Re: Interview Question Advice
« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2019, 02:24:07 PM »
I've only had two interviews so far, but no one has asked about my previous salary so far.  So it may not even come up.

I second the "work-life balance" idea.  That sounds perfectly diplomatic and reasonable. 

Another idea might be to say something like "I'd like to focus my skills more on (blank.)"  So... if customer service is important for the job you are applying for, maybe say you'd like to be more actively involved in customer service.  Find out what the most important aspect of the potential job is, and say you'd like to focus more on that. 

For example, years ago I taught English in Japan.  First company had me teaching children and adults, driving all over the place to give lessons, on-call 12 hours a day like a doctor.  Terrible schedule, horrible communication at the company, and no work-life balance.  Also, I HATED teaching the adults. In the interview for the new job, I didn't say any of that.  Instead, I said "I'm looking to narrow my focus to only teaching children, as I feel I excell in that area."  The new company only taught children, so that was exactly what they wanted to hear.  Find out what the new place wants, and say you are looking to focus more on that.  :)
Thanks for the input!

You are right that the question may not even come up - I just want to be prepared for it, just in case!

I've spoken to a few recruiters on the phone and, when asked what type of salary I'm looking for, have been saying something along the lines of, "Well, my current salary is X.  Something similar would be ideal, however I am not in a position where accepting something slightly lower is out of the question if it meant finding a role better-suited toward my skills and interests."

Something like that, anyway.

The feedback hasn't been negative, so I'm hoping it won't be a problem.

That said, I've been exchanging some very promising emails with a recruiter today who has shortlisted me for a very good vacancy that pays more than my current salary.  So hopefully the salary issue won't be a problem at all!

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Re: Interview Question Advice
« Reply #8 on: March 02, 2019, 09:53:25 AM »
Maybe just add that as well?

“”Looking for better work/life balance and now is the right time for me to find a role I feel is better suited to my skills and interests?”

Use it as an opportunity to big up your skills that you don’t feel you get a chance to use enough now that can be useful to your potential future employer.


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My, how time flies....

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Re: Interview Question Advice
« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2019, 12:19:49 AM »


I've spoken to a few recruiters on the phone and, when asked what type of salary I'm looking for, have been saying something along the lines of, "Well, my current salary is X.  Something similar would be ideal, however I am not in a position where accepting something slightly lower is out of the question if it meant finding a role better-suited toward my skills and interests."

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I feel like recruiters will ask about salary so that they don't waste your time sending you on interviews for jobs way below what you're going for.  I've not had any interviewers ask me that during an interview, here or in the US.  But you're right, it's good to be prepared!  Best of luck with the interview!
Will sell soul for Duke's Mayonnaise.


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Re: Interview Question Advice
« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2019, 07:37:37 AM »

I feel like recruiters will ask about salary so that they don't waste your time sending you on interviews for jobs way below what you're going for.  I've not had any interviewers ask me that during an interview, here or in the US.  But you're right, it's good to be prepared!  Best of luck with the interview!

They ask constantly here (most likely for the reason you gave) and I loatheeeee it as it’s followed by “what salary do you want?” .....it all depends i the package! Ideally I want more than what I make currently but for the right job, I’d even take a cut.


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My, how time flies....

* Married in the US and applied for first spousal visa August 2013
* Moved to the UK on said visa October 2013
* FLR(M) applied for  May 2016. Biometrics requested June 2016. Approval given July 2016.
* ILR applied for January 2019 (using priority processing). Approved February 2019.
* Citizenship applied for May  2019
* Citizenship approved on July 4th 2019
* Ceremony conducted on August 28th 2019

'Mommy, Wow! I'm a legit Brit now!'


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Re: Interview Question Advice
« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2019, 08:09:37 AM »
I refuse to answer that, it's none of their business and has nothing to do with your next job.  Just tell them how much you want on a very vague level. 

Recuiters don't work for you and will take your money if they can.  In some circumstances where you are actually working through the recruitment company, if the client says they will pay £200 and you say you want 150, they will pay you 150 and collect 200 from the client.

Also, NEVER tell an agent where else you are interviewing.  They will simply call that company and offer a candidate who will work cheaper.  Just lie to them, you can be sure they are lying to you when it suits.


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Re: Interview Question Advice
« Reply #12 on: March 05, 2019, 09:19:15 AM »

Also, NEVER tell an agent where else you are interviewing.  They will simply call that company and offer a candidate who will work cheaper.  Just lie to them, you can be sure they are lying to you when it suits.

Yes!! I just tell them I can’t disclose that information.



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My, how time flies....

* Married in the US and applied for first spousal visa August 2013
* Moved to the UK on said visa October 2013
* FLR(M) applied for  May 2016. Biometrics requested June 2016. Approval given July 2016.
* ILR applied for January 2019 (using priority processing). Approved February 2019.
* Citizenship applied for May  2019
* Citizenship approved on July 4th 2019
* Ceremony conducted on August 28th 2019

'Mommy, Wow! I'm a legit Brit now!'


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Re: Interview Question Advice
« Reply #13 on: March 05, 2019, 07:43:32 PM »
Yes!! I just tell them I can’t disclose that information.
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Or just tell them that you've just started looking, haven't had any serious prospects yet.  They'll know why you aren't going to tell them. 


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