Hello
Guest

Sponsored Links


Topic: Advice for finding jobs in the UK  (Read 220 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 48

  • Liked: 2
  • Joined: Apr 2019
Advice for finding jobs in the UK
« on: April 19, 2019, 07:57:27 AM »
I've never had too much trouble finding work here, but then I am also willing to accept low paying jobs and I've also learned the art of interviewing and telling people what they want to hear. I also know exactly how to blow an interview if I decide I cannot stand the interviewer lol.

It helps tremendously if you have a UK passport. Otherwise employers may not hire you, or they may be hesitant to. I never understand why people who move here don't become citizens. Seems reasonable for the UK to expect people who move here to do this. Least if they live here for a long time.

Anyway, if you are here and looking for work, Indeed basically lists most jobs in the UK. Make sure your CV looks good and doesn't read too "american". You're more likely to get a response the sooner you apply for a job once it's advertised online. Wait a week? it's probably filled. And you may have to send out 100 CVs until you get an interview or offer, especially if you have no UK work history. So be resilient.

If you do get the interview, great. That's probably just step number one. If you get through that, it's either some assessment or second interview. Or they may have you do a one day trial. Insist you get paid for this.

You should also be able to be flexible eg be able to work evenings and weekends and bank holidays. The more flexible you are, the more likely to get the job. Companies here are just not too flexible if you have small children, etc. Least I haven't found that to be the case. So many companies expect you to be available 24/7. Who is???

One thing I find quite annoying here is that they always ask how old you are. How rude lol. They also sometimes ask if you are married, and if you are white, or not. Straight, or gay. They say it's just for survey purposes, but not sure I believe this. I was once told by a male employer that he was about to put my CV in the bin after he saw that I was a yank (but he explained that because he liked my photo, which is also on my CV, he interviewed me. racist creep).

I was offered that job, and declined it.  Cannot stand that mentality. Thankfully, most employers aren't like that, although they sometimes seem a bit paranoid that you are foreign (eg lack of trust, or worried that customers won't understand you, as if you don't speak English, or they worry you won't "fit in" with the team, which is entirely their own problem and they don't even see it).

And you always get asked "what made you come here". I mean, if you went to a hotel in Spain, would they ask you at the check in desk "what on earth made you come here"...  If I had a pound coin for every time I was asked that.... I also find that a rude question but there it is, they always ask it. You can always joke and say "because I'm a glutton for punishment, gross inefficiency, passive aggression, and horrendous weather" but you may not get the  job lol. Sometimes you have to at least initially be the "american" they expect you to be. Get the job, then be yourself.  Shock horror lol. My God, we're not all alike. Years ago, shortly after I came here, I purposely blew a job interview because I didn't like the interviewer as he was a pompous little git and grilling me about being a yank, and  I finally just said "yes well it's not long ago that I got off the boat" and you could see his face just sort of drop. It was quite amusing.

Unfortunately, UK companies are becoming more like American ones, meaning breaks are sometimes discouraged, long holidays are discouraged, etc. and you are often expected to work overtime. Didn't used to be like this here. Also, many companies will do everything but draw a blood sample. They will check your background, credit wise and criminal history, etc. Even for low level jobs. It's silly.  And I was once told that my references "failed" when the person checking hadn't done her job (they hadn't failed at all), so be prepared for some absolute nonsense. Training dates set ,then changed last minute. Twice. That sort of thing.

And I have found most temp agencies a waste of time. Advertising fake jobs to get you to register. Not all, but many. So I would avoid them unless they are actually going to set up an interview for you with a real company.

Then, as many people smoke here, you find that the smokers are allowed to take a million breaks a day, while you are expected to only have your allocated breaks (usually half hour lunch and maybe one coffee break, if you're lucky). So they form a little smokers clique. Fair? No. But it's there.  This is a country of drinkers, and smokers. They smoke at work, then drink after work. Culture. or lack thereof lol x


  • *
  • Posts: 16014

  • Liked: 3833
  • Joined: Jun 2012
  • Location: Wokingham
Re: Advice for finding jobs in the UK
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2019, 08:34:17 AM »
Wow.  So. Many. Stereotypes.

But there are a couple of sentences I agree with in this mostly big steaming pile of horse sh*t.   ;D


  • *
  • Posts: 6236

  • Liked: 1025
  • Joined: Oct 2012
  • Location: Berkshire
Re: Advice for finding jobs in the UK
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2019, 10:19:01 AM »
Judging by this post, your previous post (about being here 20 years and having it sometimes feel like a prison sentence, etc.), and your previous comments to others that have come off a bit aggressive, I just want to say that I'm really sorry you seem to have had such a tough go of things for the last 20 years. There's a sentence or two in this post that I agree with but I would strongly disagree with a lot of your post so I'm wondering where you might be living here and if that vastly different experience is due to what part of the UK you're in?

I honestly hope things look up for you and that more positive experiences happen for you in future and you can meet people outside of the stereotypes you seem to come across.
My, how time flies....

* Married in the US and applied for first spousal visa August 2013
* Moved to the UK on said visa October 2013
* FLR(M) applied for  May 2016. Biometrics requested June 2016. Approval given July 2016.
* ILR applied for January 2019 (using priority processing). Approved February 2019.
* Citizenship applied for May  2019

**CITIZENSHIP APPROVED July 4, 2019! Formal ceremony on August 28, 2019!**

HEY MOM, I'M A BRIT NOW :D


  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 1035

  • Officially a UK Yank!! Established 2002
  • Liked: 38
  • Joined: May 2002
  • Location: East Sussex
Re: Advice for finding jobs in the UK
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2019, 10:23:56 AM »
I’ve found all of my UK employment by applying directly to the company itself. I have also found that my US associates degree helped me to get a job at a university. I worked for the nhs and found the nhs to be a fair employer hiring all different nationalities. I did not have much luck with temp agencies I think it was because I wasn’t available for last minute work but overall my work life in the UK has been mainly positive and I look at it as a way of helping me to adjust to the culture and meet people
My home for 17 years since June 2002.  Married February 2003. Became a citizen 2004.


  • *
  • Posts: 6236

  • Liked: 1025
  • Joined: Oct 2012
  • Location: Berkshire
Re: Advice for finding jobs in the UK
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2019, 10:36:31 AM »
I’ve found all of my UK employment by applying directly to the company itself. I have also found that my US associates degree helped me to get a job at a university.

Same and have also found, more recently, that LinkedIn is far better when it comes to applying for jobs than Indeed in my experience over the last few months. All my previous jobs here were through applying directly on company websites and the majority of my call-backs in regards to my recent applications have all either come from applications filled out directly on a company website or through LinkedIn (and there was no real timeframe as some I applied for within a day or two of posting while others had been open for a few weeks).

I know that what I studied at University when I used to list it on my CV also was very helpful when it came to meeting some of the criteria for a role such requirements for communication skills.
My, how time flies....

* Married in the US and applied for first spousal visa August 2013
* Moved to the UK on said visa October 2013
* FLR(M) applied for  May 2016. Biometrics requested June 2016. Approval given July 2016.
* ILR applied for January 2019 (using priority processing). Approved February 2019.
* Citizenship applied for May  2019

**CITIZENSHIP APPROVED July 4, 2019! Formal ceremony on August 28, 2019!**

HEY MOM, I'M A BRIT NOW :D


  • *
  • Posts: 3265

  • Liked: 653
  • Joined: Apr 2016
Re: Advice for finding jobs in the UK
« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2019, 10:58:37 AM »
I've had a rough go of things and still disagree with a number of the stereotypes here. If you're able to do low paid/low skill work that does make the transition easier, but it isn't a requirement. And if you're like me and disabled you might not be able to do certain things, no number of adjustments would make it possible. Employers can discriminate on a number of criteria related to visas, but thankfully not all do and I wouldn't want to work for a company that did. And I've been learning the many resources available to "difficult to employ" people like me. I think it's important to highlight the differences between the US hiring process and UK, mainly so that people are prepared. Also don't be afraid of short contracts because you never know if they'll lead to a permanent role. At worst it gets that invaluable "UK experience" on your CV. The most important is to not give up and keep an eye on postings even if you're not sending out applications every day. Waiting too long will mean missing your opportunity because it is so competitive.


Sponsored Links





 

coloured_drab