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Topic: UK Dangerous Dogs Act  (Read 1083 times)

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UK Dangerous Dogs Act
« on: May 31, 2019, 10:16:19 PM »
My OH is planning to come to the UK at the end of the year. He is determined to bring his dog with him (of course!), but I'm worried about how he looks. He's a Labrador cross (potentially with a Staffie) but is unsure of his background for sure. I'm worried about whether he might be classed as a "Pit Bull" looking dog under the UKs dangerous dogs act (also breeds that generally can't fly :(

He is a big/medium black dog and the requirements for a "Pit Bull" are so loose that I'm worried in case we bring him over and he's not allowed in! I'd like to find out beforehand if we will have any issues but I'm not sure if anyone has had issues with this before? I might just be waiting for something to go wrong and looking into it too much, but I just want to make sure everything goes well and I know my OH would be heartbroken if he has to leave him at the airport to fly back to the US.

Any advice or opinions are very appreciated!
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Re: UK Dangerous Dogs Act
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2019, 07:17:38 AM »
What a gorgeous boy!
March 28th 2013-Moved to UK, husband on spouse visa.Oct 20th 2015-Applied by mail for FLR(M).Feb 1st 2016 FLR(M).March 7th 2018 ILR. YAY! March 21st NCS&JCAP appointment.


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Re: UK Dangerous Dogs Act
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2019, 10:16:42 AM »
I would have DNA test done to determine breed(s).  If he doesn’t have any pit, you are golden.  If he does, it allows you guys to make plans.

Hugs!  I hope it comes back negative!


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Re: UK Dangerous Dogs Act
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2019, 06:13:23 PM »
I would have DNA test done to determine breed(s).  If he doesn’t have any pit, you are golden.  If he does, it allows you guys to make plans.

Hugs!  I hope it comes back negative!

Unfortunately it doesn't make any different as the UK base it on looks only :( They don't recognise Pit Bull as a breed, so they won't take DNA into account. It seems like such a confusing rule which is why I'm worrying... it could literally come down to how the import officer feels about him!
15/2/2008 -First Met
17/12/2017 - Finally got together
1/12/2018 - Engaged
6/7/2019 - Married
UK Spouse Visa (non-priority)
10/7/2019 - Applied online
17/7/2019 - Biometrics appt
20/7/2019 - Documents mailed
2/8/2019 - Application received email
1/10/2019 - Decision email received
4/10/2019 - Passport received and...
APPROVED :D
63 days


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Re: UK Dangerous Dogs Act
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2019, 06:30:58 PM »
Unfortunately it doesn't make any different as the UK base it on looks only :( They don't recognise Pit Bull as a breed, so they won't take DNA into account. It seems like such a confusing rule which is why I'm worrying... it could literally come down to how the import officer feels about him!

They do recognise it as a breed....  I’m confused...  https://www.gov.uk/control-dog-public/banned-dogs

The ARC is always helpful with inquiries though.  I’d contact the one at the airport you dog will be arriving at and ask what proof they will accept.


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Re: UK Dangerous Dogs Act
« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2019, 07:29:22 PM »
I did find this earlier.

Quote
This is often referred to as ‘breed specific legislation’, or ‘BSL’, but actually the law doesn’t recognise a dog’s family tree, or pedigree.

Instead, UK legislation bases the decision on whether a dog is illegal on looks alone – a dog’s breed, a dog’s parents’ breeds, DNA testing and behaviour don’t come into it.

Classing a dog as illegal based on looks alone means that half of the puppies in a litter of crossbreeds could be illegal types, when the other half of the litter is legal types.


It seems ridiculous that a negative DNA test would not count for anything but apparently  it doesn't and rather the decision is based on appearance only.

Quote
The Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) has given guidance to law enforcers on what to look for when ‘typing’ a dog. Pitbull terrier types are defined using measurements based on an American breed standard for show dogs from the 1970s. Enforcers use a tape measure for this test.

https://www.bluecross.org.uk/dangerous-dogs-act

It might be worth looking further into what these measurements are.
March 28th 2013-Moved to UK, husband on spouse visa.Oct 20th 2015-Applied by mail for FLR(M).Feb 1st 2016 FLR(M).March 7th 2018 ILR. YAY! March 21st NCS&JCAP appointment.


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Re: UK Dangerous Dogs Act
« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2019, 08:00:59 PM »
Identifying Pit Bull Terrier (PBT) types
The following information is aimed to provide a starting point for identifying Pit Bull Terrier (PBT) types. It should not be seen as an exhaustive list of characteristics and further expert advice and guidance must be sought at an early stage.
There are no photographs provided to assist with this as these animals can look very different yet have a substantial number of characteristics present and be considered a PBT.
If you cannot obtain advice from your local DLO and need assistance in identifying an alleged s1 dog you may contact the Status Dogs Unit at the Metropolitan Police at statusdogs@met.police.uk
The standard used to identify a PBT is set out in the American Dog Breeders Association standard of conformation as published in the Pit Bull Gazette, vol 1, issue 3 1977 – please refer to this for the full description and also relevant cases20 as this is only a brief overview. Although the law does not require a suspected PBT to fit the description perfectly, it does require there to be a substantial number of characteristics present so that it can be considered ‘more’ PBT than any other type of dog.
• When first viewing the dog it should appear square from the side, and its height to the top of its shoulders should be the same distance as from the front of its shoulder to the rear point of its hip.
• Its height to weight ratio should be in proportion.
• Its coat should be short and bristled, (single coated).
• Its head should appear to be wedge shaped when viewed from the side and top but rounded when viewed from the front. The head should be around 2/3 width of shoulders and 25 per cent wider at cheeks than at the base of the skull (this is due to the cheek muscles).
• The distance from the back of the head to between the eyes should be about equal to the distance from between the eyes to the tip of its nose.
• The dog should have a good depth from the top of head to bottom of jaw and a straight box-like muzzle.
• Its eyes should be small and deep-set, triangular when viewed from the side and elliptical from front.
• Its shoulders should be wider than the rib cage at the eighth rib.
• Its elbows should be flat with its front legs running parallel to the spine.
• Its forelegs should be heavy and solid and nearly twice the thickness of the hind legs just below the hock.
• The rib cage should be deep and spring straight out from the spine, it should be elliptical in cross section tapering at the bottom and not ‘barrel’ chested.
• It should have a tail that hangs down like an old fashioned ‘pump handle’ to around the hock.
• It should have a broad hip that allows good attachment of muscles in the hindquarters and
hind legs.
• Its knee joint should be in the upper third of the dog’s rear leg, and the bones below that should appear light, fine and springy.
• Overall the dog should have an athletic appearance, the standard makes no mention of ears, colour, height, or weight.


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Re: UK Dangerous Dogs Act
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2019, 11:01:13 PM »
I found the description on "Guidance for Enforcers"

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/69263/dogs-guide-enforcers.pdf

Yes, I've seen this before, but they just have to meet a majority of these to be classed as a PBT Type, and to be it just seems like that could fit most dogs :( I've found all these links but it seems there's no definitive answer and they never have pictures as they seem to want to go on peoples judgement.

I will contact ARC and maybe Blue Cross and Dogs Trust for advice as well. My OH is getting his measurements as we'd need some for his airline crate anyway so I'll get a few more and see if anyone from those organisations can help!

Thanks!
15/2/2008 -First Met
17/12/2017 - Finally got together
1/12/2018 - Engaged
6/7/2019 - Married
UK Spouse Visa (non-priority)
10/7/2019 - Applied online
17/7/2019 - Biometrics appt
20/7/2019 - Documents mailed
2/8/2019 - Application received email
1/10/2019 - Decision email received
4/10/2019 - Passport received and...
APPROVED :D
63 days


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Re: UK Dangerous Dogs Act
« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2019, 11:56:30 PM »
I hope you can sort this out and he can come to the UK.  He is very handsome.


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