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Topic: Ok, what's "normal" for traveling to an interview?  (Read 1934 times)

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Re: Ok, what's "normal" for traveling to an interview?
« Reply #15 on: October 04, 2019, 01:51:17 PM »
Interesting. When I've applied at the MOD I was told I had to have at least three years in-country to be able to qualify for clearance for an entry-level job. Jobs with the Home Office (or it's subsidaries) require five years. This particular position was with another governmental entity, so I'd assume one of the two of those apply. (?)

Maybe because your son is a citizen it's different?
MOD would have different security checks to the ones required by average jobs. For example, HO might require SC Clearance which requires you (typically) to have lived in the country for 5 years minimum.

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Re: Ok, what's "normal" for traveling to an interview?
« Reply #16 on: October 04, 2019, 07:51:29 PM »
Hi, no, I did not state it was with MOD - this one was not.  ;)

Not sure if they consider this an "average" job or not, though. Either way, no word back from them at all. So... scratched off the list.


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Re: Ok, what's "normal" for traveling to an interview?
« Reply #17 on: October 04, 2019, 08:32:50 PM »
Hi, no, I did not state it was with MOD - this one was not.  ;)

Not sure if they consider this an "average" job or not, though. Either way, no word back from them at all. So... scratched off the list.
If it's not a government body, a subcontractor of a government body, or anything that involves higher security clearance beyond DB checks, i'd consider it average just on this context (for all intents and purposes) ;)

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My, how time flies....

* Married in the US and applied for first spousal visa August 2013
* Moved to the UK on said visa October 2013
* FLR(M) applied for  May 2016. Biometrics requested June 2016. Approval given July 2016.
* ILR applied for January 2019 (using priority processing). Approved February 2019.
* Citizenship applied for May  2019
* Citizenship approved on July 4th 2019
* Ceremony conducted on August 28th 2019

'Mommy, Wow! I'm a legit Brit now!'


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Re: Ok, what's "normal" for traveling to an interview?
« Reply #18 on: October 05, 2019, 12:06:06 PM »
If it's not a government body, a subcontractor of a government body, or anything that involves higher security clearance beyond DB checks, i'd consider it average just on this context (for all intents and purposes) ;)

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I agree.

My company used to pay about £100 to an outside firm to do basic background checks on all prospective employees, and there was also a drug test to be done. The drug testing was more to do with the fact it was a chemical company so a relatively dangerous place to oneself and coworkers if the safety procedures are not followed correctly because one is under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
Dual USC/UKC living in the UK since May 2016


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Re: Ok, what's "normal" for traveling to an interview?
« Reply #19 on: October 05, 2019, 01:20:51 PM »
I agree.

My company used to pay about £100 to an outside firm to do basic background checks on all prospective employees, and there was also a drug test to be done. The drug testing was more to do with the fact it was a chemical company so a relatively dangerous place to oneself and coworkers if the safety procedures are not followed correctly because one is under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

A drug check in the UK?  I've never heard of that.  I didn't even think they did that in the military here.


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Re: Ok, what's "normal" for traveling to an interview?
« Reply #20 on: October 05, 2019, 01:42:31 PM »
A drug check in the UK?  I've never heard of that.  I didn't even think they did that in the military here.

It is not common which is why I pointed  out the safety issues in my company’s circumstances.

https://www.tuc.org.uk/resource/drug-testing-workplace

Quote
Despite claims from drugs-testing companies, there is no real evidence that drug-testing is becoming common-place in British workplaces. It is mainly used, often with union agreement, in safety critical areas such as transport and energy generation. There is also increased usage in the construction industry.
Dual USC/UKC living in the UK since May 2016


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