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Topic: Scottish Gardening  (Read 462 times)

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Scottish Gardening
« on: November 10, 2019, 04:13:01 PM »
Ok... now that I've got a house with a private garden and enough space to plant some vegetables, when should I start my seeds? I plan on doing chilis, sweet peppers, tomatoes, lettuce, spinach maybe a few other non root vegetables.

I'm in Central Scotland just near the Ochils.

And do you have a favourite seed supplier?

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Re: Scottish Gardening
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2019, 05:09:04 PM »
I get my chili seeds from South Devon chili farm. You may want a heated propagator for those, I didn't have much luck without one last year and definitely should have started them earlier. The seed packs usually have instructions for when to start indoors or sown directly into the ground. Good luck!

I just got a bunch of 32L pots for my garden next summer, and 3 blueberry bushes w/ the ericaceous compost. I hope they grow OK :)

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Re: Scottish Gardening
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2019, 07:38:13 AM »
Ok... now that I've got a house with a private garden and enough space to plant some vegetables, when should I start my seeds? I plan on doing chilis, sweet peppers, tomatoes, lettuce, spinach maybe a few other non root vegetables.

I'm in Central Scotland just near the Ochils.

And do you have a favourite seed supplier?



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Hope this helps




https://www.glendoick.com/Fruit-Vegetables-for-Scotland
« Last Edit: November 11, 2019, 07:43:46 AM by Honolulubeachbunny »


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Re: Scottish Gardening
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2019, 07:48:19 AM »


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Re: Scottish Gardening
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2019, 08:52:05 AM »
I like Real Seeds, Dobies (not the same as Dobbies, but both into gardening), and Victoriana Nursery for online seeds.
I take it you will be growing in a greenhouse or polytunnel?  If not, you'll definitely want cloches, or a really sunny/warm space. 

Chillies need a long start, so late January/early February is good. Definitely need heat - so indoors, heated propagator, or heat mats are your best bet.
Tomatoes you can start a bit later (March/April).  Lettuce/spinach you can sow whenever is starts to get slightly warm, then pretty much all spring and late summer/autumn, little and often is good. 
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Re: Scottish Gardening
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2020, 09:35:03 AM »
Resurrecting this topic....

Just a FYI:  Chillis of various varieties grow well in pots indoors. We have two Longhorn pepper plants and two Ramiro pepper plants that I've kind of kept bonsai'd with careful pruning. They live in a south-facing window. They are now almost three years old and I still get a few peppers off of them on a regular basis. We also still have the cayenne peppers I planted when we first got here. They are in the kitchen (north) window where they've been all along. Right now there are about 8 pepper pods between the two plants, and half-a-dozen flowers. Which need help to be pollenized.

One thing I've noted is that all of them have had hell with spider mites and aphids. Indoors! Having tried a lot of concoctions purchased from various sources that said they'd take care of the problem, the best result has come from simply putting them under a good stream of cold water in the shower at the first sign that the little rotters are back again.  Also, they like fish-tank water - lots of nice nutrients, no chance of "over-fertilizing" them then. They do go semi-dormant in the winter when there's not much light, but they come back just fine in the summer.

Just a thought, if you don't have a garden or other outside space.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2020, 09:37:49 AM by Nan D. »


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