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Topic: NHS and medication (Scotland)  (Read 582 times)

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NHS and medication (Scotland)
« on: March 23, 2020, 08:39:56 AM »
Hypothetically -

Someone has a genetic metabolic condition (supported by detailed bloodwork & biopsy results) that has been successfully treated for years with a given dietary supplement, and they move to the UK (let's say Scotland since their NHS is a bit different).

In the USA the supplement was considered medically necessary, but private insurance didn't cover it because it wasn't on their formulary (considered experimental treatment).

Said individual could bear the cost of purchasing the supplement. In times of shortage, is there any advantage to having a prescription from the NHS for this supplement? Does the NHS reserve medications for "official" patients in times of shortage? Or do they even write prescriptions for experimental medications? Would said individual have to be trotted all the way through the NHS metabolic diseases service to get such a prescription?

Hypothetically speaking, of course.


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Re: NHS and medication (Scotland)
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2020, 09:02:42 AM »
Hypothetically -

Someone has a genetic metabolic condition (supported by detailed bloodwork & biopsy results) that has been successfully treated for years with a given dietary supplement, and they move to the UK (let's say Scotland since their NHS is a bit different).

In the USA the supplement was considered medically necessary, but private insurance didn't cover it because it wasn't on their formulary (considered experimental treatment).

Said individual could bear the cost of purchasing the supplement. In times of shortage, is there any advantage to having a prescription from the NHS for this supplement? Does the NHS reserve medications for "official" patients in times of shortage? Or do they even write prescriptions for experimental medications? Would said individual have to be trotted all the way through the NHS metabolic diseases service to get such a prescription?

Hypothetically speaking, of course.
Are we talking about melatonin? Hypothetically?

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Re: NHS and medication (Scotland)
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2020, 11:43:39 AM »
Hypothetically, no.

Kaneka Ubiquinol (not ubiquinone), B-100 complex, and carnitor, as a cocktail.

The first one being, hypothetically, the most important. The last one doesn't help much and the side effects are gross. So hypothetically it would be the first and second.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2020, 11:56:40 AM by Nan D. »


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Re: NHS and medication (Scotland)
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2020, 12:06:35 PM »
Hypothetically, no.

Kaneka Ubiquinol (not ubiquinone), B-100 complex, and carnitor, as a cocktail.

The first one being, hypothetically, the most important. The last one doesn't help much and the side effects are gross. So hypothetically it would be the first and second.
Start here.

https://www.communitypharmacy.scot.nhs.uk/nhs-boards/nhs-greater-glasgow-clyde/specials/

The NHS doesn't stockpile medication like that. We will have quotas for some meds. We may only be able to order say x packs of a specific med in x amount of time.

If it is a medication shortage, that can be extremely difficult. Recently, there was a worldwide shortage of epanutin suspension. We had to import it from Canada and that was a hassle. We could only order 1 bottle a week.

And a lot of stuff, there is a manufacturer supply issue and no one is getting it. We have to recommend a replacement to the GP, wait for a new prescription and then hope the alternative doesn't go out of stock.

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Re: NHS and medication (Scotland)
« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2020, 12:12:21 PM »
It's likely that for a special product on the NHS the initial script would need to come from a consultant due to cost/lack of availability. A number of my meds have been like that. Have you ever looked at the private pharmacy https://dicksonchemist.co.uk? I have a number of friends who get LDN from them, they may be able to assist with metabolic conditions.

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Re: NHS and medication (Scotland)
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2020, 03:36:03 PM »
Start here.

https://www.communitypharmacy.scot.nhs.uk/nhs-boards/nhs-greater-glasgow-clyde/specials/

The NHS doesn't stockpile medication like that. We will have quotas for some meds. We may only be able to order say x packs of a specific med in x amount of time.

If it is a medication shortage, that can be extremely difficult. Recently, there was a worldwide shortage of epanutin suspension. We had to import it from Canada and that was a hassle. We could only order 1 bottle a week.

And a lot of stuff, there is a manufacturer supply issue and no one is getting it. We have to recommend a replacement to the GP, wait for a new prescription and then hope the alternative doesn't go out of stock.

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Oh my.  Ok, thanks, Tami. That link was enlightening.

So it's also unlikely that a local GP would write a prescription for this sort of thing anyway, right? The NHS here would insist that the hypothetical patient be sent to the metabolic service to be seen and get a prescription? (Or genetics, or ???)


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Re: NHS and medication (Scotland)
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2020, 04:04:32 PM »
Oh my.  Ok, thanks, Tami. That link was enlightening.

So it's also unlikely that a local GP would write a prescription for this sort of thing anyway, right? The NHS here would insist that the hypothetical patient be sent to the metabolic service to be seen and get a prescription? (Or genetics, or ???)
More than likely, yes. You also have to figure in the cost when it comes to GPs.  They have a prescription budget and a lot of times they will refuse to prescribe a medication (could be a special but not necessarily) because it eats into their budget.

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Re: NHS and medication (Scotland)
« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2020, 04:49:42 PM »
Hmmm.

Ok, next hypothetical question. Private medical care. If one paid for a doctor's visit (non NHS) would there necessarily be a restriction on a pharmacy if the person was also paying for the medication?  Or is it even possible to pay for a prescription?

Hypothetical variant of above - is it possible to go to a NHS GP and get a non-NHS prescription written, and would a pharmacy then be able to sell that medication to you?


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Re: NHS and medication (Scotland)
« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2020, 04:53:40 PM »
Hmmm.

Ok, next hypothetical question. Private medical care. If one paid for a doctor's visit (non NHS) would there necessarily be a restriction on a pharmacy if the person was also paying for the medication?  Or is it even possible to pay for a prescription?

Hypothetical variant of above - is it possible to go to a NHS GP and get a non-NHS prescription written, and would a pharmacy then be able to sell that medication to you?
Yes, you can get a private prescription filled at the pharmacy. And you will pay for it. If you search for the name of the medication along with Scottish drug tariff, you can approximate the cost.

I don't think NHS GP's can write private prescriptions. But not 100% on that.

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Re: NHS and medication (Scotland)
« Reply #9 on: March 23, 2020, 05:09:44 PM »
Thanks.

Hypothetically.  ;) ;D


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Re: NHS and medication (Scotland)
« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2020, 06:49:35 PM »
Hmmm.

Ok, next hypothetical question. Private medical care. If one paid for a doctor's visit (non NHS) would there necessarily be a restriction on a pharmacy if the person was also paying for the medication?  Or is it even possible to pay for a prescription?

Hypothetical variant of above - is it possible to go to a NHS GP and get a non-NHS prescription written, and would a pharmacy then be able to sell that medication to you?
Have you heard of Dr Myhill? It looks like her private books are closed but she runs a shop for metabolic related products. I get some supplements from her, unsure if they have the things you need or comparable substitutions. https://www.salesatdrmyhill.co.uk/

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Re: NHS and medication (Scotland)
« Reply #11 on: March 23, 2020, 06:54:36 PM »
A friend of mine asked me to get DHEA for her on my recent trip to the USA.  I asked where I could get it and she said she wasn't 100% sure but had heard it was readily available.  She had been paying £200 to see a private doctor in London, plus the cost of the prescription (10mg).  I got her a bottle of 300 at Costco (25mg so she's cutting them in half) for $16. 

As she said, it's easier to get cocaine here than DHEA.  She has a point....

She asked her GP if he would prescribe and asked a private GP who she saw for a non-related issue.  She needs it as she had a hysterectomy at 25.

I'm now her dealer.   ;D


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Re: NHS and medication (Scotland)
« Reply #12 on: March 24, 2020, 08:53:41 AM »
Oy!


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