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Topic: Current New York to London to New York travel...?  (Read 4275 times)

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Re: Current New York to London to New York travel...?
« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2020, 03:33:00 PM »
A non critical medical appointment during quarantine would really not be OK, if you are skipping care now it can certainly wait two weeks. Going to a medical facility for a non emergency appointment puts *everyone* at risk. I'm sorry but things like that make me angry, so many people have been waiting for surgeries and essential care and you think that it's fine for you to just hop the line and go private while you may be contagious if you pick up covid on the plane. A doctor should refuse to see you during quarantine for any routine/non emergency care. (In A&E they have the covid areas separate to everyone else so they are prepared for it.)


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Re: Current New York to London to New York travel...?
« Reply #16 on: July 27, 2020, 01:59:31 PM »
Thanks ksand24, this is really helpful.

See here for the government guidelines on how to quarantine in the UK:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-how-to-self-isolate-when-you-travel-to-the-uk/coronavirus-covid-19-how-to-self-isolate-when-you-travel-to-the-uk [nofollow]

If you will be quarantining in England, these are guidelines for when you can leave your house:


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Re: Current New York to London to New York travel...?
« Reply #17 on: July 27, 2020, 02:08:45 PM »
KFdancer, thanks. I am currently living and working in two places, that's the problem. But covid-19 means I am stranded. Any kind of pain is only taken seriously in the USA if you have good health insurance. In my case, my US health insurance does not cover what I need. I can't afford the insurance that would "cover" it as well as the deductible because the insurance doesn't actually cover it; and I can't afford the out of pocket cost ($12,000 to $16,000 per year for the treatment but only 25% that for private treatment in the UK). Sorry about the paracetamol, but on the plus side, at least UK hospitals don't charge for an ambulance, the bed, and childbirth costs. But why only paracetamol? I've not heard of that before.

You really should see a doctor where you live.  Doctors are not keen on treating patients when they won't be around for proper follow ups.  Not to mention pain management it taken much more seriously in the USA.  I mean, I managed to get paracetemol when I was in labour in the UK.


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Re: Current New York to London to New York travel...?
« Reply #18 on: July 27, 2020, 02:24:51 PM »
A non critical medical appointment during quarantine would really not be OK, if you are skipping care now it can certainly wait two weeks. Going to a medical facility for a non emergency appointment puts *everyone* at risk. I'm sorry but things like that make me angry, so many people have been waiting for surgeries and essential care and you think that it's fine for you to just hop the line and go private while you may be contagious if you pick up covid on the plane. A doctor should refuse to see you during quarantine for any routine/non emergency care. (In A&E they have the covid areas separate to everyone else so they are prepared for it.)

Thanks Margo. Depends how you describe critical or non-critical. There’s a point with my condition where if I don’t have treatment, eventually I can become housebound. Unable to work on a computer. Unable to walk to the supermarket. I am way overdue and worried about leaving it much longer. It’s not life or death, but if it gets any worse, then two weeks in quarantine with no assistance will be a bit hellish. The only place I could find to quarantine is 300 miles from family. And this is the plan, because I am taking this seriously. No, I don’t actually think it is “fine for (me) to just hop the line and go private while (I) may be contagious if (I) pick up covid on the plane”. Can’t you see that this is a huge dilemma, pain is involved, I’ve spent a few weeks agonising over this, and I came here asking for advice and info so I could and would follow the rules. Just because I said I’m going to have private treatment does not mean that I plan to skip the quarantine. Just because I asked what is acceptable during quarantine does not mean that I plan to skip the quarantine. Just because I asked what medical treatment is acceptable during the quarantine does not mean that I am going to ignore the rules. I am flying tomorrow and the earliest appointment I can get is in three weeks. Please reserve your anger for all those people hanging out in bars, gathering on crowded beaches, and refusing to wear masks in Tesco. I have been stuck in one apartment for 6 months now, seen no friends, only my wife, have not been on a bus, train or taxi in six months, and have just been working from home and trying to do the right thing. I’ve shopped for food with a mask for six months. I’ve been waiting so patiently that my condition is now just about at the point of “critical”. Meanwhile, Trump only advocated wearing masks for the first time last week, just as England made it a rule that face coverings must be worn when shopping.



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Re: Current New York to London to New York travel...?
« Reply #19 on: July 27, 2020, 02:52:20 PM »
Many people on this forum live in debilitating pain and receive limited to no help from the NHS. And during lockdown to the present time many of us have had no access to care, private or otherwise, so it is a very sensitive subject if it seems someone would be flaunting regulations (which happens quite often). I'm glad you have found a location to quarantine and will be following the guidelines. If you have an urgent issue during that time (or anytime), you'd want to call/go online to 111 for help or 999 if it's an emergency. I do understand pain can be an emergency, but you would need to go to a hospital ER that has a hot and cold wing during the quarantine period. I hope you are in less pain and able to access your treatment soon!

And yes, the NHS solution for everything is paracetamol. Before I saw the pain management specialists I was sent to the ER doubled over in pain from a woman's health issue, and they still forced me to take 2 uncoated paracetamol tablets before they would consider anything else and that just made me puke. Also 3 stabs to get an IV line in that they never used. I went home in more pain than I showed up in, and had to wait 3 days for treatment for the issue the Dr's sent me in for. They don't care if you can barely stand up!


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Re: Current New York to London to New York travel...?
« Reply #20 on: July 27, 2020, 05:47:13 PM »
No, I don’t actually think it is “fine for (me) to just hop the line and go private while (I) may be contagious if (I) pick up covid on the plane”.

There is nothing wrong with going private and a lot of Brits now have to do this or they get a job where they are given private insurance as a perk of their job. The UK also has visas for those who want to come to the UK for private medical treatment. All this gives money to the NHS instead of people taking from the budget of each NHS trust.

It was revealed a few years ago that although millions more people had arrived in the UK over the last decade, the government received less in taxes now than a decade before! The government site they had at that time for suggestions for what Brits would like to see changed, had a lot of angry Brits on there saying how wrong it was that their relatives who had paid taxes to the UK for decades, were now stuck on a waiting list for treatment with those who had not, with some suggesting the NHS should have an A and B waiting lists.

Don't worry about giving to the NHS by paying for your own treatment.




« Last Edit: July 27, 2020, 05:54:56 PM by Sirius »


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Re: Current New York to London to New York travel...?
« Reply #21 on: July 28, 2020, 08:28:42 AM »
All this gives money to the NHS instead of people taking from the budget of each NHS trust.
Can we just unpack this one sentence?  Funny how people paying privately for treatment are "giving" money to the NHS while normal users are "taking from the budget".   That's a ridiculous way to describe it, as the private patients are not just giving money as a donation, they are also getting expensive treatment from the NHS.  And of course users of the NHS "take" from the budget, it's money budgeted to be used.  It's the whole point of the NHS.  The budget is theirs to "take" because they paid for it through taxes. 
I don't really have a dog in the fight of private treatment on the NHS, but I can't stand someone twisting words to pass a falsehood off as truth.   Private users are both giving and taking, as well as normal users of the NHS.  To emphasise only the negative aspects of one and only the positive aspects of another is doing exactly that. 

I'll leave it to others to pick out the other bits that are just as fatuous.   


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Re: Current New York to London to New York travel...?
« Reply #22 on: July 28, 2020, 08:44:54 AM »
My issue wasn't really with the private care, it was trying to use it while under quarantine. I had a search and apparently certain London trusts have a significant number of private beds so private care is a large part of its operating budget. But right now, I know a lot of people who have been waiting for care considered urgent, have about an hour a day they can even be upright, and have for months because covid cancelled everything. This isn't a normal time for medical care unfortunately.


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Re: Current New York to London to New York travel...?
« Reply #23 on: July 28, 2020, 06:48:24 PM »
Can we just unpack this one sentence?  Funny how people paying privately for treatment are "giving" money to the NHS while normal users are "taking from the budget".   

You (and camascato) haven't made a secret of the fact that you are paying little taxes to the UK. Yet you both want free treatment on the NHS and i haven't seen either of you stating you use private insurance to pay for your treatment or that of your children.

Nor have I seen either of you saying you are paying for your children to go to private schools and others are having to pay for this too.

And I know you said you were claiming benefits for your children, which others are having to give you.

etc


That's a ridiculous way to describe it, as the private patients are not just giving money as a donation, they are also getting expensive treatment from the NHS.

Treatment which  they pay for and the NHS gains from these people: this is exctra money for the NHS and the budget of that trust does not have to be used. Some even pay their full taxes in the UK and still don't ask for free treatment on the  NHS.

And of course users of the NHS "take" from the budget, it's money budgeted to be used.  It's the whole point of the NHS.  The budget is theirs to "take" because they paid for it through taxes. 

Except some aren't paying much in taxes and still expect  to "take". Less money in taxes and yet millions more in the UK,  is not going to mean more free treatment/shorter waitng lists. You will be telling us next that we (via the government) should pay more into the NHS.

It's been a refreshing change to see somebody say they are going to pay for their treatment on the NHS.





« Last Edit: July 28, 2020, 06:53:41 PM by Sirius »


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Re: Current New York to London to New York travel...?
« Reply #24 on: July 28, 2020, 10:28:37 PM »
Thank you to Leah for a great source of information, which I found very helpful when I was moving to the UK. I wish you and all the other helpful people here all the best.

You (and camascato) haven't made a secret of the fact that you are paying little taxes to the UK. Yet you both want free treatment on the NHS and i haven't seen either of you stating you use private insurance to pay for your treatment or that of your children.

Hey, a$$hole, I pay just as much tax to the UK as every other British citizen, so you ought to just keep your fcuking Tory immigrant-hating mouth shut and go fcuk yourself.

« Last Edit: July 28, 2020, 10:33:21 PM by camoscato »


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Re: Current New York to London to New York travel...?
« Reply #25 on: July 29, 2020, 07:36:22 AM »
A non critical medical appointment during quarantine would really not be OK, if you are skipping care now it can certainly wait two weeks. Going to a medical facility for a non emergency appointment puts *everyone* at risk. I'm sorry but things like that make me angry, so many people have been waiting for surgeries and essential care and you think that it's fine for you to just hop the line and go private while you may be contagious if you pick up covid on the plane. A doctor should refuse to see you during quarantine for any routine/non emergency care. (In A&E they have the covid areas separate to everyone else so they are prepared for it.)

All of which assumes that private medical care offices are seeing anyone at present. Our NHS GP is still doing telephone triage only. The pharmacies are open, and have been during the epidemic emergency. To get a NHS prescription here we have to physically walk to the GP to pick up the piece of paper and hand-carry it back to the pharmacy, and then come back a couple of days later to pick it up. (All the prescriptions are filled at a central service center, I believe.) Thankfully, we have not needed to get a medication or refill medication during the pandemic - I have no idea how they are handling that.

Normally I ask for and have had no problem getting Naproxen. Not strong enough at all times, but better than the paracetamol (sp?) that seems to be recommended for everything. Paracetamol (tylenol - acetaminophen) is bad for people with liver issues, so if you have those you'll want to be sure to let your doctor know. It is also ineffective for low back pain and similar: Paracetamol is ineffective in the treatment of low back pain and provides minimal short term benefit for people with osteoarthritis. These results support the reconsideration of recommendations to use paracetamol for patients with low back pain and osteoarthritis of the hip or knee in clinical practice guidelines.  https://www.bmj.com/content/350/bmj.h1225  I can vouch that it's like taking a sugar pill - does absolutely nothing for spinal nerve pain. At all. The Naproxen does help some, though.

When looking at private insurance, you might investigate those that have a telemedicine option - you have your consultation with your doctor via the internet or phone. I know Vitality (insurance) has that option. We got that for my daughter when we came over here because it was relatively cheap, met all her regulatory needs, and had that service. We haven't used it because we never got a smart phone - and it has to be one with a specific operating system to work - and actually never really needed to use it. Most of the UK  insurances I was looking at here require that you go to your GP first and they then pick up costs if you want to go private after that point. My retirement package from the US includes insurance that has a telemedicine option, but because the doctors are in the USA it's no good for any prescription medications over here. One has to have an in-country doctor to prescribe medication (as is the case in the USA). My USA plan also allows me to see any private doctor and get a reimbursed rate, or to use one on their list (I think that's all there actually is on their list in Glasgow - one!) for a substantially higher reimbursement.

It might behoove you to do some research on your private insurance options, as there may well be one that solves your problem. Good luck! :)
« Last Edit: July 29, 2020, 07:54:47 AM by Nan D. »


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Re: Current New York to London to New York travel...?
« Reply #26 on: July 29, 2020, 08:28:27 AM »
Thank you to Leah for a great source of information, which I found very helpful when I was moving to the UK. I wish you and all the other helpful people here all the best.

Hey, a$$hole, I pay just as much tax to the UK as every other British citizen, so you ought to just keep your fcuking Tory immigrant-hating mouth shut and go fcuk yourself.


Gosh, I was going to type out a long response and then found out @camoscato  already provided the perfect answer.   
I am almost certain that I pay far more taxes than you, probably both net and as an overall percentage of my income.  I am also fairly certain that I, like most immigrants, have made this a better place since I have been here. 

I did notice that you quickly switched to ad hominem attacks rather than try to defend what you originally said or actually address what I said.  All you did was repeat the same junk again, when my complaint was with the way it was worded to present a totally inaccurate picture.   


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Re: Current New York to London to New York travel...?
« Reply #27 on: July 29, 2020, 08:59:04 AM »
All of which assumes that private medical care offices are seeing anyone at present. Our NHS GP is still doing telephone triage only. The pharmacies are open, and have been during the epidemic emergency. To get a NHS prescription here we have to physically walk to the GP to pick up the piece of paper and hand-carry it back to the pharmacy, and then come back a couple of days later to pick it up. (All the prescriptions are filled at a central service center, I believe.) Thankfully, we have not needed to get a medication or refill medication during the pandemic - I have no idea how they are handling that.

Normally I ask for and have had no problem getting Naproxen. Not strong enough at all times, but better than the paracetamol (sp?) that seems to be recommended for everything. Paracetamol (tylenol - acetaminophen) is bad for people with liver issues, so if you have those you'll want to be sure to let your doctor know. It is also ineffective for low back pain and similar: Paracetamol is ineffective in the treatment of low back pain and provides minimal short term benefit for people with osteoarthritis. These results support the reconsideration of recommendations to use paracetamol for patients with low back pain and osteoarthritis of the hip or knee in clinical practice guidelines.  https://www.bmj.com/content/350/bmj.h1225  I can vouch that it's like taking a sugar pill - does absolutely nothing for spinal nerve pain. At all. The Naproxen does help some, though.

When looking at private insurance, you might investigate those that have a telemedicine option - you have your consultation with your doctor via the internet or phone. I know Vitality (insurance) has that option. We got that for my daughter when we came over here because it was relatively cheap, met all her regulatory needs, and had that service. We haven't used it because we never got a smart phone - and it has to be one with a specific operating system to work - and actually never really needed to use it. Most of the UK  insurances I was looking at here require that you go to your GP first and they then pick up costs if you want to go private after that point. My retirement package from the US includes insurance that has a telemedicine option, but because the doctors are in the USA it's no good for any prescription medications over here. One has to have an in-country doctor to prescribe medication (as is the case in the USA). My USA plan also allows me to see any private doctor and get a reimbursed rate, or to use one on their list (I think that's all there actually is on their list in Glasgow - one!) for a substantially higher reimbursement.

It might behoove you to do some research on your private insurance options, as there may well be one that solves your problem. Good luck! :)

NHS Trusts vary enormously around the country it seems. Both my wife and I have been getting our prescriptions via an online service for a couple of years now.  When more is needed we just order online or from our phone with the new NHS app. My wife’s last appointment at the eye hospital was cancelled because of the lockdown but her consultant called her one Sunday morning at 08:35 while we were out walking to say that he had just returned from the USA and had a new eye drop treatment he wanted her to try. A couple of days later while walking on the moor our local surgery called to say that they had received a new prescription for her, asked a few questions then added it to her record. It arrived in the post a few days later. 3 weeks later the consultant called again, a more reasonable time but again we were out walking on the moor, he asked her how the new prescription was working and since it was much better than the last one said he would inform her GP to make it into a repeat prescription. So now she just orders it online whenever the current bottle is getting low.

We have had great service from the NHS since we returned in 2016 and my wife has also had a telephone appointment with her GP, scheduled at a particular date and time last year, when hands on was not required. I look forward to the next stage of video appointments although I was called for my annual heart check and blood work 2 weeks ago which was done under the new Covid protection scheme, don’t enter more than 5 minutes before appointment etc. Very well organized.
Dual USC/UKC living in the UK since May 2016


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Re: Current New York to London to New York travel...?
« Reply #28 on: July 29, 2020, 10:10:34 AM »
Thank you to Leah for a great source of information, which I found very helpful when I was moving to the UK. I wish you and all the other helpful people here all the best.

Hey, a$$hole, I pay just as much tax to the UK as every other British citizen, so you ought to just keep your fcuking Tory immigrant-hating mouth shut and go fcuk yourself.



No!!!!! Don’t leave us!!!!!!!


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Re: Current New York to London to New York travel...?
« Reply #29 on: July 29, 2020, 10:52:49 AM »
No!!!!! Don’t leave us!!!!!!!

I think he means that he might not have any choice... but we won't let that happen!  :)


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