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Need phone advice quick!
« on: August 31, 2020, 06:05:42 PM »
Is this kinda basic smartphone a decent one for $99?

https://ting.com/shop/motorola-moto-g-fast_Pearl-White-32GB-new-multi-network


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Re: Need phone advice quick!
« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2020, 06:25:55 PM »
The link won't load for me, which model is it?


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Re: Need phone advice quick!
« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2020, 07:28:19 PM »
Motorola moto g fast

https://www.motorola.com/us/smartphones-moto-g-fast/p is a different link.
I'm rather horrified that it only gets two days on a battery charge (my current, now unusable candybar got like 30 days).

My other logical choice is a NUU Mobile F4L which is probably better for my purposes.

« Last Edit: August 31, 2020, 08:03:45 PM by Nan D. »


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Re: Need phone advice quick!
« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2020, 08:48:58 PM »
Motorola moto g fast

https://www.motorola.com/us/smartphones-moto-g-fast/p is a different link.
I'm rather horrified that it only gets two days on a battery charge (my current, now unusable candybar got like 30 days).

My other logical choice is a NUU Mobile F4L which is probably better for my purposes.
My husband has a Motorola g7 power and the battery lasts days with frequent use, that might be better for you? The maps feature is what I use the most on my phone when out and about. :)


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Re: Need phone advice quick!
« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2020, 09:39:24 PM »
Only if it's cheap! ;D


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Re: Need phone advice quick!
« Reply #5 on: August 31, 2020, 10:01:52 PM »
Only if it's cheap! ;D
Cheap is a relative thing with smartphones, because unfortunately the OS stops being supported after a certain time forcing an upgrade. I usually buy 1.5-2 years out of date to get an affordable phone and it lasts for 3-4 years. Going too cheap will result in a useless brick that just annoys you.


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Re: Need phone advice quick!
« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2020, 11:27:25 PM »
Yeah, and batteries that can't be replaced. We went with the feature phone. It'll be here on Thursday. It has some very limited internet, which should be enough.


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Re: Need phone advice quick!
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2020, 11:59:02 AM »
Phone came. First thing it did was phone home and update itself, before I could switch the wireless off. Oh, well, that'll mean I'll have to pay for the first tier of data this once. It's not a lot of money.

Was able to get that turned off, and power saver on. Which is good, because I was sitting here watching it drain the battery - would have gotten maybe 6 hours out of it with all the bells and whistles on. Now it's been on overnight and is still at 94%. I can make calls and texts, which is all I wanted. And I have a phone number in the local area code now. So I can call AAA for breakdowns and can have our USA phone number (voip) forwarded here - the Daughter can talk to her friends in California for pennies now as long as it's a they call her and not her call them situation. That'll help with the lock-down mental health situation I think!  ;D

It came with Facebook and WhatsApp installed. Having a hell of a time figuring out how to uninstall them. Do NOT want them on my phone. :(  Especially not FB. Advertising didn't say they'd be there, so that's irritating. Chrome is there also, so I think I should probably leave that in case of emergency where I might need to access the internet via the phone. Also has bluetooth - I guess that is for accessories like earpieces? But at least the phone works and is a flippy phone so I can just answer by opening it and hang up by closing it, which is perfect for me. It is a Nuu F4L. Daughter says it runs a lite version of Android and that's why it was using so much battery initially.

When we were activating it sent a text with a link in it. There is no manual with this phone.  I can't figure out how to click the link. I assume that, as with our last phone, it's not possible? (If I turn the wifi back on, I mean.)  Chatted with the phone company, they just sent info links that we had already found ourselves. Now that the phone actually can make calls, I will try to call the Nuu helpline. But if anyone knows how to get bloatware off my phone, and click the links, it's a lot easier for me to read info that hear it on a phone. (Getting old.)

Thanks.


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Re: Need phone advice quick!
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2020, 06:29:26 PM »
Controls & Using The Touchscreen
While your NU2S smartphone certainly has a number of buttons you can push, you will
control it primarily by using the touchscreen. You may wonder just how many different
ways one can touch a screen, and as it turns out there are a few of them! You’ll find a
handy list of the most common ones below, which includes the name for the gesture and
a description how to perform it.
Important!:
 Your phone’s touchscreen is NOT pressure-sensitive, as it instead works
 by sensing tiny electrical currents. This means that when you touch the
 screen, you only need to make contact, you do not need to apply
 pressure. If your fingertips are heavily callused (or if you are wearing
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 non-conductive gloves), the screen may not “hear” you or register your
 touches properly. In that case, try a different fingertip or a patch of bare skin.
“Tap”: In some documentation, this may also be referred to as a “touch” or even a
“click”. It’s almost exactly like tapping your finger on a table; aim a single fingertip, touch
it to the screen, and pull it away from the screen. You can have your finger in contact with
the screen for quite a bit before the phone registers it as a “long-press”, so don’t feel like
you have to pull away instantly.
“Double-tap”: Two taps in rapid succession, almost exactly like double-clicking a
mouse, but with your fingertip. Rarely called a “double-click”. Used for different things in
different apps, so make sure to consult the help for that app!
“Long-press”: Sometimes referred to as “hold” or “tap-and-hold” or “touch-and-hold”.
Place your finger on the screen and keep it there. After about a full second, the phone
will recognize this as a long-press and give you some kind of feedback: a menu might
appear, an icon might start shaking, or some element of the interface will change to
indicate that you have the phone’s complete attention.
What makes the long-press a little difficult is that in some apps, removing your finger from
the screen makes your next selection, and in other apps, you’re expected to make a
separate “tap” to select the thing you want after a long-press. This behavior isn’t
constant across all apps so you’ll need to experiment a little with your apps.
“Drag-and-drop”: Sometimes mentioned as “drag-n-drop”, “drag”, or “touch, hold,
and drag”. First you long-press something, then once you’ve gotten the visual feedback that shows that the phone interpreted your long-press, you keep your finger on the
screen as you move it around. When you remove your finger from the screen, you “drop”
the item in question.
The usual example is moving your app icons around. First you long-press the icon in
question until you see it get “picked up” or highlighted somehow, then (keeping your
finger on the screen) you “drag” the icon to its new spot. When you let go, you’ve
“dropped” it. The key part is that a drag-and-drop always starts with a long-press.
“Slide”: Closely related to the drag-and-drop. While a drag-and-drop requires a
long-press at the beginning, a slide does not. Unlocking the phone, answering a call, and
bringing up Google Now all require slide motions, where you slide an on-screen button in
a straight line, with no pause or delay after touching the button.
“Swipe”: A swipe is a gesture that’s just like moving a playing card across a smooth felt
table. There’s no pause at either end, just a smooth motion. The tricky part of swiping is
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what is meant by the term “swipe left” or “swipe right”.
In NUU documentation (and Google’s) the direction refers to the way your fingertip goes.
So “swipe left” means your fingertip starts on the right side of the screen and goes to
the left. That swiping left often looks like the whole app “jumped” to the right is where the
potential confusion comes from. When in doubt, follow your fingertip!
Swiping is normally used to bring a menu onto the screen, switch between windows, or
other large-scale actions that involve most or all of the screen instead of just a single part,
like the slide.
“Two-finger swipe”: Just like a regular swipe, but with two fingertips instead of just
one. Sometimes you’ll even see apps that ask for a three-finger swipe, but this is pretty
rare.
“Pinch”: Sometimes simply referred to as “zoom” and the two terms are often combined into “pinch-to-zoom”. Google sometimes calls it “scale”. This refers to placing two
fingertips on the screen and either pinching them together or spreading them apart to
change the size of something, usually a picture or a web page. Note that you can often
rotate an image with this gesture as well as zoom.
Those Three Buttons
At the bottom of the screen you’ll find three buttons (consult the NU2S Overview
diagram for their location).
Here’s what they do.
Recent: Tapping this button brings up the “Recent” menu. This is a vertical list of apps
that are currently active. If you have Chrome’s “merge tabs” feature turned on, Recent
also lets you switch between Chrome tabs. You can slide the list up and down to see the
whole list. Slide an app’s picture off the screen (left or right works) to make it inactive.
You can also tap the app’s X button to do the same thing. This is often referred to as
“killing” or “force-quitting” an app, and it’s a useful thing to know as doing so can solve
many problems with a misbehaving app!
Home: The Home button has two main functions. Tapping the Home button will always
take you back to your Home screen, the “center” screen in the pages of icons you can
have on your phone. If you’re lost, tap Home and you’ll be taken back to familiar territory!
Recent Home Back
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Common Onscreen Buttons
 Drawer: This button is used to access a general menu in a particular app. In
 Google Maps, for example, it lets you switch between map and satellite view,
 among other things. In GMail, the Drawer allows you to switch between folders.
 If your app has a Drawer button, you should familiarize yourself with the options it
 presents. Sometimes the Drawer is also referred to as “options” or “hamburger”
 or, confusingly, “menu”.
 Share: Pressing Share allows you to send the content of your current app to
 someone else. For example, when looking at the details for an app in the Play
 Store, using the Share button allows you to send a link to that app by e-mail,
 Bluetooth, MMS, or in a variety of other ways. The same thing can be done in the
 Contacts app and other places. Sometimes this button is referred to as “Send” or
 “Send Using...”.
 Overflow: The official name is both “Menu” and “Overflow”, but NUU
 documentation uses “Overflow” to avoid confusion. Sometimes also known as
 “options” or “the stoplight”. Whatever its name, this button brings up options
 relevant to the current screen. If you were looking at a Contact card, for example,
 “Overflow” would allow you to edit, delete, share, or set the ringtone for that
 contact only. “Overflow” provides access to your bookmarks and other settings in
 the Google Chrome app.
Long-pressing the Home button brings up the Search app, which lets you search the
contents of your phone and the web at the same time.
Back: This does exactly what its name suggests; it takes you back one step. If you
called up a sub-menu, for example, and wanted to go back to the previous menu, just
tap the Back button one time to do that. If you tap Back enough times, you will
eventually work all the way to your Home screen, so this is another way of getting back
to familiar territory if you’re lost.


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Re: Need phone advice quick!
« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2020, 06:30:46 PM »


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Re: Need phone advice quick!
« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2020, 06:35:15 PM »
Looks like the setting menu has a section for apps that will hopefully allow you to delete Facebook and What's App.  All the way at the end of this wall of text


The Settings Menu
The settings menu is a complex but necessary part of your smartphone. It allows you to
connect to wireless networks, manage the apps stored on your phone, and change your
security settings just to name a few among many options.
You can find the settings menu either on one of your Home screens or in All Apps.
Read on for an item-by-item breakdown of each part!
WIRELESS & NETWORKS
Wi-Fi: Tap Wi-Fi to enter the sub-menu. Tapping the word “Wi-Fi” enters the sub-menu.
Tapping the ON/OFF switch turns Wi-Fi on or off. There you may scan for new networks,
add one manually, use the Wi-Fi Protected Setup option, and change advanced network
options with the Overflow button.
Connecting to a new Wi-Fi network is a matter of scanning for networks (tap Overflow >
Refresh), tapping the name of the desired network, and entering the password for the
network when prompted.
Forgetting a network is likewise easily accomplished: tap the name of the connected
network and choose “Forget”. This is a useful troubleshooting step for network problems,
so keep it in mind.
NOTE: Exercise caution when choosing a Wi-Fi network. When in doubt, only
connect to networks owned by operators you trust!
Bluetooth: See the previous section on Bluetooth connections.
HotKnot: See the previous section on HotKnot for the details.
SIM Cards: This shows you the status of your installed SIM cards. Each SIM card has
an ON/OFF switch you can toggle independently. If you tap the SIM card’s name, you
can change the color assigned to it as well as view its phone number and change its
name.
If you have two SIM cards installed, this menu lets you choose which card is used for
calls, data, and SMS messages.
Data Usage: This menu shows you detailed data statistics, including which app is using
how much data. Each SIM card has its own button up top which lets you see statistics
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for just that card as well as toggle cellular data usage with the ON/OFF switch.
Take note of the Overflow button, as it holds the menu option that controls whether or not
you use cellular data while roaming! Just go to Overflow > Cellular Networks and set the
switch. Note that allowing roaming can get VERY expensive, very quickly!
If you ever need to alter your APN settings, this is also the place to do it, through the
Celluar Networks sub-menu. Your carrier may request that you do this to improve
performance.
More: Brings up the following...
Airplane Mode: Use the ON/OFF switch to toggle Airplane Mode, which turns off all
communication with your phone, including calls, Wi-Fi, and cellular data. You can also
access the Airplane Mode toggle by holding down the Power Button as if you were going
to reboot your phone.
Default SMS App: If you have more than one SMS app installed, you may select which
one is used by default here.
Tethering & Portable Hotspot: Allows you to turn your phone into a portable Wi-Fi
hotspot as well as tether its Internet connection directly to another Wi-Fi or Bluetooth
device.
NOTE: Some carriers disallow these practices, so check your documentation
carefully! Also be aware that tethering and hotspot usage can eat up your
monthly allotment of data very quickly!
VPN: Cellular Networks: You can configure data roaming preferences and APNs here.
Your carrier may have you adjust APN settings to improve performance.
DEVICE
Display: Adjust your brightness and wallpaper, as well as toggling whether your display
rotates automatically when your phone is tilted. The Sleep sub-menu determines how
soon your phone goes to sleep, while the Daydream sub-menu lets you configure what
your phone displays while it is plugged in and charging. The Font Size sub-menu
changes the system font size--this is particularly useful to make the many items in
Settings more readable!
You may also control what the phone does when rotated, and, if you have access to a
Chromecast, how that connection is made.
Sound & Notifications: You can choose between four sound profiles here (General,
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Silent, Meeting, and Outdoor). Each one has its own settings, which you can access by
first tapping on the profile you want to adjust and then tapping the gear that will appear
on the right. Once there, you can change the volume for alarms and the ringer, as well as
the notification sound used and how the phone should vibrate and when it should vibrate.
The Notification sub-menu lets you control how notifications are seen when the phone is
locked as well as let you configure notifications on a per-app basis.
The Interruptions sub-menu changes what level of interruption you allow calls and
notifications to have when you are doing other things. Particularly useful is the Downtime
section, which lets you assign a block of time during which your NU2S will be quiet unless
a priority interruption comes in. If you set this to “Don’t Interrupt”, none of your alarms or
timers will sound.
Lastly, the Sound Enhancement menu lets you optimize the phone’s sound for its
speaker or for your headphones.
Storage: This sub-menu displays the status of your smartphone’s internal storage as
well as that of any microSD card you have installed. The information is sorted by type of
content, and you also have options to un-mount or erase microSD cards. You can also
change the Default Write Disk, which is where the NU2S chooses to store things; we
highly recommend using a microSD card and assigning it as that default write disk!
Battery: Shows you the current battery status and breaks down battery usage by app
and hardware. Now you can find out if it’s your screen or a particular app eating up all
your battery! There is also a Battery Saver option you can turn on and adjust via the
Overflow menu. This lets you reduce the phone’s performance to save battery power.
Apps: One of the largest sub-menus you’ll encounter, Apps has many functions. First,
it will show you exactly what apps are installed on your phone and the amount of space
each one takes up. Secondly, you can see the space used on both the smartphone’s
internal storage and its microSD card here. Lastly, tapping on an app lets you stop it from
running, disable it completely (not all apps allow that), uninstall it (again, not all apps allow
uninstallation), clear its data, and view the permissions the app uses.


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Re: Need phone advice quick!
« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2020, 08:45:17 PM »
Thanks.

It's a Nuu F4L, not a NU2S though.  ;D


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Re: Need phone advice quick!
« Reply #12 on: September 06, 2020, 11:09:34 AM »
Oh well, worth a try. 


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