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Topic: Covid D variant  (Read 2533 times)

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Re: Covid D variant
« Reply #15 on: June 27, 2021, 06:55:20 PM »
So seriously, end the thread.

At this point, I'm kind of wondering if what people say to me  could possibly be true, just an iota - that people  usually end up getting what they deserve in the long run. As petty and horribly unflattering a thought as that is.  ::)  (Except for those caught as collateral damage, of course, who are just generically screwed.)

So:

Your country.
Your government.
Your health department/vaccine developers/vaccinators.
Your public propaganda campaign.
Your people.
Your misery.
Your problem.

Happy now?

I'm not. I'm still worried about you all. And, good night. :(


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Re: Covid D variant
« Reply #16 on: June 27, 2021, 07:25:25 PM »
I saw a GP interviewed on TV. He said "The best vaccination to take is the one you are offered."

I held on to that whenever efficacy was discussed ...and gratefully accepted AZ.


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Re: Covid D variant
« Reply #17 on: June 27, 2021, 08:50:34 PM »
I saw a GP interviewed on TV. He said "The best vaccination to take is the one you are offered."

IMO, this is so true.  In this time of incredible demand and limited supply, being able to get a vaccine (any vaccine) is a privilege; being able to choose is a super privilege.


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Re: Covid D variant
« Reply #18 on: June 27, 2021, 09:14:12 PM »
IMO, this is so true.  In this time of incredible demand and limited supply, being able to get a vaccine (any vaccine) is a privilege; being able to choose is a super privilege.
We only have the AZ vaccine down here... I assume because it’s the only one they can easily transport to remote parts of the world... so I haven’t had a choice in which vaccine I get. But that’s fine... as long as I get one of the vaccines, I’m good (my second AZ jab is tomorrow :) ).


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Re: Covid D variant
« Reply #19 on: June 27, 2021, 09:28:42 PM »
Nan,

I’m sure you think I’m very sad to believe government figures but the very high rates of vaccines are breaking the link between infections and serious illness.  Over 80% of adults have had 1 dose and over 60% are fully vaccinated.

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/vaccines-highly-effective-against-hospitalisation-from-delta-variant

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The analysis suggests:

the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is 96% effective against hospitalisation after 2 doses
the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine is 92% effective against hospitalisation after 2 doses
These are comparable with vaccine effectiveness against hospitalisation from the Alpha variant.


The latest figures show hospitalization and deaths still at low levels. The vast majority of new infections are in the age ranges 7 to 12 and 18 to 24. Folks at school are testing themselves twice a week. The UK probably does more testing per day than any other country in the world.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-51768274
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Re: Covid D variant
« Reply #20 on: June 27, 2021, 10:22:08 PM »
I saw a GP interviewed on TV. He said "The best vaccination to take is the one you are offered."

I held on to that whenever efficacy was discussed ...and gratefully accepted AZ.

Without question!!

One of my closest friends led one of the clinical studies for one of the approved vaccines being used.  She has a very informed opinion, but she said the best one is the one you can get first.

Nan, I only said USA v UK, as you LIVE in the USA so you are not  aware of the news we are being fed here.  The message here is “new variant is rampant, we are not in the clear yet”. 

Personally I think both countries should be disgusted that we are hogging vaccines and not doing our part for a borderless pandemic. 


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Re: Covid D variant
« Reply #21 on: June 27, 2021, 11:16:57 PM »
Personally I think both countries should be disgusted that we are hogging vaccines and not doing our part for a borderless pandemic.

For sure.

My brother and his wife have been stuck in South Africa for the last 1.5 years with no easy way to move back to the UK... and they are now experiencing further lockdown restrictions due to a third wave, with no sign of getting vaccinated any time soon. They’ve said they doubt they will be offered a vaccine before the end of the year.


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Re: Covid D variant
« Reply #22 on: June 28, 2021, 07:58:02 AM »
I'm pretty sure I also heard an expert say, that over time viruses tend to become more transmissible but less severe. Because it would be counter productive if they killed off all their hosts.


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Re: Covid D variant
« Reply #23 on: June 28, 2021, 08:55:33 AM »
They’ve said they doubt they will be offered a vaccine before the end of the year.

Stories like this are the reason I don't care what vaccine I got.  I was thankful for it and hope everyone has a chance to get one as well.


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Re: Covid D variant
« Reply #24 on: June 28, 2021, 10:27:30 AM »
Stories like this are the reason I don't care what vaccine I got.  I was thankful for it and hope everyone has a chance to get one as well.

Completely agree. And it’s AZ and J&J that will end the pandemic as those vaccines can be transported without specialist equipment to every point in the globe.  We just need to stop hoarding!


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Re: Covid D variant
« Reply #25 on: June 28, 2021, 12:17:24 PM »
Ahh, I think Nan, it's very easy to worry and you feel kin and friendship to our country so of course you're watching with interest. The same in reverse as we watch our families and friends in the US act like nothing is happening now.   It's easy for us to compare that way as we're in similar boats. 

Okay, we can see too that Israel has a high proportion of folks vaccinated with Pfizer and there are some break through cases there at the moment and they're re-imposing indoor mask mandates there.  Might be knee jerk, because we associate rising numbers with more deaths and that's a hard thing to get your head around  being different after 18 months of pandemic. Of course, there is still the debilitation of long Covid, even if there are less deaths.

Also, it appears that the Chinese vaccine is really doing a terrible job!  Many poor countries could only access the Chinese vaccine because the rich are hoarding the new technology ones and they're really struggling now with high case rates. These countries are pissed off!   

Basically, of course, this is still very much a pandemic, we're not out of it yet, we are very lucky with high vaccine (of any kind) uptake. It's scary, things will continue to change, things may get worse before they get better and there might be waves of restrictions. There are many places in the world where it is getting worse, due to having no vaccine access. It will continue. There are places in the world where they act like there is no pandemic now and it will probably soon bite them in the backside. We won't know the full extent of anything until many years when we look at the data historically.  And man, we have SO MUCH data now.  There are fabulous Tableau charts from Scotland's public health that everyone can access can geek over. Amazing.  But also ,can easily make someone anxious and confused. 

What will we learn for the future? How can we prevent and plan for this again? Will we heed historical lessons, or will we have politicians who only care for themselves and not their constituents? 

Stay safe and healthy friends! 
I've never gotten food on my underpants!
Work permit (2007) to British Citizen (2014)
You're stuck with me!


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Re: Covid D variant
« Reply #26 on: July 25, 2021, 02:41:15 PM »
So seriously, end the thread.

At this point, I'm kind of wondering if what people say to me  could possibly be true, just an iota - that people  usually end up getting what they deserve in the long run. As petty and horribly unflattering a thought as that is.  ::)  (Except for those caught as collateral damage, of course, who are just generically screwed.)

So:

Your country.
Your government.
Your health department/vaccine developers/vaccinators.
Your public propaganda campaign.
Your people.
Your misery.
Your problem.

Happy now?

I'm not. I'm still worried about you all. And, good night. :(

Im still wondering why people jumped on you over this, + tests and deaths up 50% every week for this month, and we have yet to see the results of the ending of lockdown. There have been numerous breakthrough cases, and the Olympics have been a debacle for + tests so far. every transmission is another dice roll of a new strain being developed, people are not learning from last two go arounds!


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Re: Covid D variant
« Reply #27 on: July 25, 2021, 03:27:51 PM »
The infection rate has been dropping rapidly this last 4 days, probably an indicator that the infections from the mass spreader events of the Euro football finals have peaked. There will probably be another wave, hopefully smaller, from the July 19 relaxation of lockdown rules. During the previous surge of Delta there was a much higher percentage of  infections resulting in hospitalizations and deaths.

While there have been some vaccine breakthrough infections practically none have resulted in ICU admissions and deaths.

The infections are now predominantly among the 16-24 age group and that will resolve itself with either vaccines or immunity from further Covid infections.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jul/25/seriously-ill-young-people-in-current-covid-admissions-expert-warns?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

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While young people are generally at lower risk from Covid, experts have warned that some nevertheless become very ill and can develop long Covid.

The latest data from the Office for National Statistics shows that the coronavirus in England is now largely an infection among young adults, with cases in 16- to 24-year-olds almost six times more common than in 50- to 69-year-olds.



Dual USC/UKC living in the UK since May 2016


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Re: Covid D variant
« Reply #28 on: July 25, 2021, 03:39:16 PM »
When my wife and I were in hospital recently to give blood for testing as part of the mixed vaccine trial we are in I noticed one of the staff had also given a blood sample so asked her if she was also part of the trial. She told me that she was part of the Siren trial where over 49,000 NHS volunteers that had had Covid were being tested to see how long the antibodies from the infection stayed in their blood. Even though most had now been vaccinated the scientists can tell the difference between Covid induced antibodies and Vaccine induced antibodies.

Reinfection is rare and it is hoped that the protection from having had Covid  is long lasting, but that has still to be determined.

https://www.hra.nhs.uk/planning-and-improving-research/application-summaries/research-summaries/siren-sars-cov2-immunity-and-reinfection-evaluation-covid-19-uph/

Quote
Research summary
The aim of this study is to find out whether healthcare workers who have evidence of prior COVID-19, detected by positive antibody tests, compared to those who do not have evidence of infection (negative antibody tests) are protected from future episodes of infection. We will recruit healthcare workers to be followed for at least a year and study their immune response to the virus causing COVID-19. We will do this by collecting data on their history of COVID-19 infection and any new symptoms. Individuals who work at a healthcare site will be asked to have a swab to detect the virus causing COVID-19 every other week in order to detect mild cases or cases without symptoms. This is the main test that is currently used to detect and diagnose infection. It looks directly for the virus in the nose and/ or throat. Once the infection is cleared, we cannot detect virus in swab samples. Therefore, we will also ask these individuals to have blood samples taken at least once per month to determine whether they have antibodies to the infection. These blood samples allow the previous infection to be detected because the response to infection (the immune response) in the body is to produce antibodies in the blood. It takes up to 4 weeks to make enough antibodies to fight the infection. But once someone recovers, antibodies stay in the blood at low levels– this is may help prevent re-infection. For COVID-19 we do not know yet if the detection of antibodies protects people from future infections. Through this study, we will provide this very important information which will help us to understand the future impact of COVID-19 on the population. [Study relying on COPI notice]


The CDC has also been studying this.

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Yes, you should be vaccinated regardless of whether you already had COVID-19. That’s because experts do not yet know how long you are protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. Even if you have already recovered from COVID-19, it is possible—although rare—that you could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 again. Studies have shown that vaccination provides a strong boost in protection in people who have recovered from COVID-19. Learn more about why getting vaccinated is a safer way to build protection than getting infected.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/faq.html

« Last Edit: July 25, 2021, 03:42:33 PM by durhamlad »
Dual USC/UKC living in the UK since May 2016


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Re: Covid D variant
« Reply #29 on: August 04, 2021, 08:10:03 AM »
Yes my aunt is a nurse in a hospital and she is part of this blood testing. Antibodies still strong over a year after infection. Yes she tried to tell me how they know the difference but my head got a little bit blown. Something to do with different type of 'memory cells' or something  [smiley=dizzy2.gif]
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