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Topic: The legalities of being an American in Britain  (Read 64502 times)

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Re: The legalities of being an American in Britain
« Reply #75 on: March 13, 2007, 05:19:36 PM »
I forgot to mention that I don't claim US residency and haven't since August 2000.


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Re: The legalities of being an American in Britain
« Reply #76 on: April 13, 2007, 05:37:28 PM »
Just 2 Random notes

Social Security gets your address from your tax forms. I am a stay at home mom with no income, I sent off a blank 1040 including only my address in the UK and Zero income. I receive my Social Security statements regularly at my UK address

I can not stress how important this is for newcomers. If you are applying for a temporary visa with intent to stay after the two years. Do not delay from the date the visa is issued to the date you enter the UK to live. For example do not apply for your visa in say June and move to the UK in July. If there is a two week delay or more you will have to apply for an extension and then for your residency resulting in double the paperwork and more fees.


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Re: The legalities of being an American in Britain
« Reply #77 on: July 28, 2007, 08:12:29 PM »
Social Security gets your address from your tax forms. I am a stay at home mom with no income, I sent off a blank 1040 including only my address in the UK and Zero income. I receive my Social Security statements regularly at my UK address

Shells, I am in the same situation as you. And although I have spoken to an IRS representative every year for the past four years and have gotten the same answer about not having to send in a blank 1040 form, I think perhaps I'd better start doing so (at least next year). My question to you is, do you send one in every year or just the one time.

And, where do I get a 1040 form since I am not working and haven't had to claim anything.

Thanks.
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Re: The legalities of being an American in Britain
« Reply #78 on: July 29, 2007, 12:43:50 AM »
Shells, I am in the same situation as you. And although I have spoken to an IRS representative every year for the past four years and have gotten the same answer about not having to send in a blank 1040 form, I think perhaps I'd better start doing so (at least next year). My question to you is, do you send one in every year or just the one time.

And, where do I get a 1040 form since I am not working and haven't had to claim anything.

Thanks.
You can download it on the computer. Maybe IRS.gov


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Re: The legalities of being an American in Britain
« Reply #79 on: July 29, 2007, 07:25:19 PM »
Shells, I am in the same situation as you. And although I have spoken to an IRS representative every year for the past four years and have gotten the same answer about not having to send in a blank 1040 form, I think perhaps I'd better start doing so (at least next year). My question to you is, do you send one in every year or just the one time.

And, where do I get a 1040 form since I am not working and haven't had to claim anything.

Thanks.

Yes I just downloaded the pdf from the website mentioned above.  Tech you could only send one in if you move so that they always have your current address. Its not mandatory by any means however I like having the record of what I have paid into over the years. (even if the future benefits are debatable!) I am a creature of habit. I just can not not file a tax return...and after 2 years of living here I still carry ID with me...


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Re: The legalities of being an American in Britain
« Reply #80 on: October 06, 2007, 01:05:38 AM »
Yes I just downloaded the pdf from the website mentioned above.  Tech you could only send one in if you move so that they always have your current address. Its not mandatory by any means however I like having the record of what I have paid into over the years. (even if the future benefits are debatable!) I am a creature of habit. I just can not not file a tax return...and after 2 years of living here I still carry ID with me...

This is really good advice. 

While you don't need to file a form, should, in later years, you start to have income or some other connection back to the US, the lack of forms will be 'troubling' in the eyes of the IRS computer and may trigger actions later (i.e. you may raise the chance of getting an audit the next time you DO have income that needs to be reported).  While perfectly explainable (and legal) not to file, having that paper trail, for the cost of a postage basically, is something really valuable. 


Re: The legalities of being an American in Britain
« Reply #81 on: September 01, 2008, 04:00:01 AM »
I can not stress how important this is for newcomers. If you are applying for a temporary visa with intent to stay after the two years. Do not delay from the date the visa is issued to the date you enter the UK to live. For example do not apply for your visa in say June and move to the UK in July. If there is a two week delay or more you will have to apply for an extension and then for your residency resulting in double the paperwork and more fees.

I'm way late to this party, but I wanted to ask what you meant by this exactly?  When I spoke to Worldbridge last week, they told me that once my (spousal settlement) visa is issued, I will have 28 days to get to the UK, or the visa gets revoked or voided or whatever and then I would have to pay to reapply.   Is that what you are talking about?

It IS a good thing to mention, as I had always assumed I would have more time to play about between the paperwork completing and the move.


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Re: The legalities of being an American in Britain
« Reply #82 on: September 01, 2008, 07:35:30 AM »
I'm way late to this party, but I wanted to ask what you meant by this exactly?  When I spoke to Worldbridge last week, they told me that once my (spousal settlement) visa is issued, I will have 28 days to get to the UK, or the visa gets revoked or voided or whatever and then I would have to pay to reapply.   Is that what you are talking about?

It IS a good thing to mention, as I had always assumed I would have more time to play about between the paperwork completing and the move.

Spousal visas are now issued for 27 months instead of 24, so now you have almost four months to enter.  The visa will *not* be revoked if you don't enter within this time, but if you're not in the UK for the requisite 2 years minus 28 days before your visa expires, you won't be able to apply for ILR and will have to pay to extend the spouse visa instead.  Which is why when spousal visas were issued for exactly 2 years that you had to enter within 28 days or else you wouldn't be living in the UK for long enough when it came time for ILR. 

But UKvisas has done a good thing recently and extended the spousal visa term from 24 to 27 months, so it gives you three months plus 28 days to enter on your spouse visa for the first time and not have any problems with an ILR application in 2 years.
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Re: The legalities of being an American in Britain
« Reply #83 on: September 01, 2008, 08:56:44 AM »
now you have almost four months to enter. 

Thank you!  This is useful and very helpful and I feel better already.    When I called Worldbridge, the girl on the phone was almost comically unhelpful and very hard to understand, speaking incredibly fast.    I asked her to email me the right paperwork and she sent the email without the attachments.  I emailed them to ask again and they mailed me four broken links.   

Are they always this terrible?   Is there a different or better agency to deal with or should I just suck it up and plan to spend a LOT of time double checking them?

Thanks again!  I love you guys!


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Re: The legalities of being an American in Britain
« Reply #84 on: September 01, 2008, 02:40:11 PM »
PLEASE make a complaint about this.  It is appalling, and it happens way too often.

Vicky


Re: The legalities of being an American in Britain
« Reply #85 on: September 01, 2008, 07:48:57 PM »
I knew something was up when she told me it would be $108 dollars to apply for my spousal settlement visa.   I had to correct her and then she said, "Oh wait.  One THOUSAND and eight."

I'm going to have grey hair for my wedding.  :)   I will complain tomorrow when I call, loudly.  They aren't open on Labor Day.    Thanks again!!


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Re: The legalities of being an American in Britain
« Reply #86 on: October 16, 2008, 11:50:48 PM »
I have dual citizenship US and UK. My wife is an American. Does she have British citizenship through me?

I found this item.

If you are married to a national of another country
Under the nationality laws of some countries, a married person automatically has his or her partner's nationality. Children may also have a parent's nationality even if they were born abroad. If your wife, husband or child is visiting the country of your nationality, you should check with the country's consulat[/font]

If anyone would know, it would be you lot.

I'm pretty sure the answer is NO. Because you are having to apply for citizenship and I know you are married to a Brit.

So somehow this automatic citizenship doesn't apply.


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Re: The legalities of being an American in Britain
« Reply #87 on: October 17, 2008, 12:10:35 PM »
No.  The UK demands a period of residency before citizenship can be passed onto a spouse.

Vicky


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Re: The legalities of being an American in Britain
« Reply #88 on: October 17, 2008, 12:49:42 PM »
I have dual citizenship US and UK. My wife is an American. Does she have British citizenship through me?

I found this item.

If you are married to a national of another country
Under the nationality laws of some countries, a married person automatically has his or her partner's nationality. Children may also have a parent's nationality even if they were born abroad. If your wife, husband or child is visiting the country of your nationality, you should check with the country's consulat


Where did you read that?


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Re: The legalities of being an American in Britain
« Reply #89 on: October 17, 2008, 12:50:10 PM »
It is true of some countries, just not the UK.

Vicky


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