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Topic: BREXIT  (Read 2039 times)

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BREXIT
« on: July 26, 2017, 06:52:40 PM »
Some more details for EU citizens after Brexit, which also includes the link Nan put on earlier for updates on the status of EU citizens in the UK.

https://www.gov.uk/apply-for-a-uk-residence-card/overview

Key points on here seems to be -


If you already have a permanent residence document it won’t be valid after the UK leaves the EU.

A new scheme will be available for EU citizens and their family members to apply to stay in the UK after it leaves the EU.




A residence card usually lasts up to 5 years. However, your residence card won’t be valid after the UK leaves the EU.

A new scheme will be available for EU citizens and their family members to apply to stay in the UK after the UK leaves the EU.

If your residence card expires before the new scheme is available, you should reapply for another residence card.


Not forgetting too that residence cards can become invalid if the EEA citizen/their EEA citizen sponsor, stops exercising treaty rights.


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Re: BREXIT
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2017, 07:47:17 PM »
That's gonna generate a LOT of paperwork.

I wonder what they'll charge.  Or if they'll keep making us non-EU-ers pay for the EU applications.


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Re: BREXIT
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2017, 07:59:44 PM »
Or if they'll keep making us non-EU-ers pay for the EU applications.

We're all immigrants here.

Solidarity!
I just hope that more people will ignore the fatalism of the argument that we are beyond repair. We are not beyond repair. We are never beyond repair. - AOC


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Re: BREXIT
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2017, 08:01:38 PM »
We're all immigrants here.

Solidarity!

Which is why we should be treated equally!!!   ;D


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Re: BREXIT
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2017, 08:18:40 AM »
Amber Rudd asks for analysis of EU migration

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/jul/27/amber-rudd-asks-for-analysis-of-eu-migration-a-year-after-referendum

Why now? Shouldn't the Tories have done this three years ago, before that silly Referendum?



I just hope that more people will ignore the fatalism of the argument that we are beyond repair. We are not beyond repair. We are never beyond repair. - AOC


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Re: BREXIT
« Reply #5 on: July 27, 2017, 08:29:10 AM »
Amber Rudd asks for analysis of EU migration

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/jul/27/amber-rudd-asks-for-analysis-of-eu-migration-a-year-after-referendum

Why now? Shouldn't the Tories have done this three years ago, before that silly Referendum?

Yes they should.

Their entire remain campaign was on the cost and impact on the economy, they did nothing to counter the immigration claims of the leave campaign.

A proper study is well overdue.
Dual USC/UKC living in the UK since May 2016


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Re: BREXIT
« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2017, 08:32:43 AM »
And more to the point, in what other areas are we flying blind into the negotiations? There is no plan at all is there?

Every day you pick up the papers and it is a slow-motion train wreck.
I just hope that more people will ignore the fatalism of the argument that we are beyond repair. We are not beyond repair. We are never beyond repair. - AOC


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Re: BREXIT
« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2017, 10:09:58 AM »
Did I mention that my current biggest client is opening an office in Amsterdam and all the permies are afraid they are going to lose their jobs?  Multiply that by every company in the city and there's another part of the train wreck.  Thanks Brexit voters!


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Re: BREXIT
« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2017, 01:23:09 PM »
That's gonna generate a LOT of paperwork.

They want them all registered so that they know who is in the UK as the EU doesn't do backgound checks on all the EEA and non-EEA citizens using EU routes/European Court of Justice Rulings. Being registered will also make it easier to stop NHS abuse and benefits abuse as UKVI has access to those systems now and they have a hotline to UKVI.

This should have been done decades ago anyway as some other EEA countries already make those in the their couuntry under EU laws/ECJ Rulings, report to their police. The UK have only ever done that for those in the country on a UK visa, if they are a citizen of certain countries and for illegals/overstayers to report if they aren't detained.

I wonder what they'll charge.  Or if they'll keep making us non-EU-ers pay for the EU applications.

 ;D They are worried that they will have to pay the same as those on visas.

A suggestion on other forums from those who paid for UK visas, is to put a massive rise on the British citizenship fee as EU laws stops at PR.

The UK bringing in new EEA Regs this year, has upset quite a few of the millions using EU routes and who were hoping to get British citizenship before Brexit, to  secure their stay. Only half a million of the millions who used EU routes to enter the UK, have managed to get British citizenship since the UK voted to leave the EU.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2017, 02:33:06 PM by Sirius »


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Re: BREXIT
« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2017, 05:35:21 PM »
And more to the point, in what other areas are we flying blind into the negotiations? There is no plan at all is there?

Every day you pick up the papers and it is a slow-motion train wreck.

In every area!  I am no EU fan*, but at the same time, if the Tories wanted to use the promise of a referendum to get votes, they really should have had some kind of contingency for if (when!) the referendum passed.  And, really, they should have drafted the referendum in more certain terms.  The day after the vote, when it passed, nobody knew what it meant because it was non-binding.  I mean, that's basic and they had already messed up.

Edited to add:  * I love the people and the individual states.  It's the organization and their tendency to play fast and loose with their own rules and regulations that I have had issue with.  Not to sound too much like my father, but "If we're going to have rules, we must enforce them."
« Last Edit: July 27, 2017, 05:38:31 PM by jfkimberly »
9/1/2013 - "fiancée" (marriage) visa issued
4/6/2013 - married (certificate issued same-day)
5/6/2013 - FLR(M)#1 in person -- approved!
8/1/2016 - FLR(M)#2 by post -- approved!
8/5/2018 - ILR in person -- approved!
22/11/2018 - Citizenship (online, with NDRS+JCAP) -- approved!
14/12/2018 - I became a British citizen.  :)


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Re: BREXIT
« Reply #10 on: July 27, 2017, 05:39:45 PM »
In every area!  I am no EU fan*, but at the same time, if the Tories wanted to use the promise of a referendum to get votes, they really should have had some kind of contingency for if they referendum passed.

It was just like the recent general election. If they had any idea in the slightest that they were going to loose, the vote would never have happened. They really thought it was not possible.
March 28th 2013-Moved to UK, husband on spouse visa.Oct 20th 2015-Applied by mail for FLR(M).Feb 1st 2016 FLR(M).March 7th 2018 ILR. YAY! March 21st NCS&JCAP appointment.


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Re: BREXIT
« Reply #11 on: July 27, 2017, 08:13:08 PM »
Just got this email blast from the Home Office:

"The Home Secretary has today asked the Government’s independent advisers on migration, the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC), to complete a detailed assessment of the role of EU citizens in the UK economy and society.

The MAC, which comprises a group of internationally recognised experts in their field, will examine the British labour market, the overall role of migration in the wider economy and how the UK’s immigration system should be aligned with a modern industrial strategy.

Today’s commission does not affect EU citizens already living here. It concerns the future immigration system. Over the coming months the MAC will consult widely with businesses, employer organisations and EU citizens working in the UK.

On 26 June, the government outlined its proposal to protect the position of EU citizens in the UK – and UK nationals in the EU. It contained these commitments:

    EU citizens with settled status will continue to be treated as if they were UK nationals for education, healthcare, benefits, pensions and social housing after we leave the EU.
    No EU citizen currently in the UK lawfully will be asked to leave at the point we leave the EU. In fact we will allow up to two years for people to regularise their status.
    The process to apply for settled status will be streamlined and user friendly, and will include those who already hold a permanent residence document under current free movement rules. We expect the system to be up and running in 2018.

EU citizens do not need to apply for documentation confirming their status now.

The rights of EU citizens living in the UK – and of UK citizens in the EU – were a key part of discussions between the UK and the European Commission last week.  There was agreement on a large number of issues. In fact, agreement has been reached on half the points that both sides have identified as forming a future agreement on citizens’ rights.

A jointly-published UK-EU note sets this out in more detail. This represents a significant step forward in providing reassurance and certainty to EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU.

The next round of negotiations is scheduled for late August.

We understand that EU citizens living in the UK will be watching progress carefully and will be looking for certainty about the future. It is important we keep you up to date about this work and everything the government is doing on citizens’ rights. That is why you have received this email today.

Meanwhile, please visit Status of EU citizens in the UK: what you need to know for further details about the 26 June policy proposal and you can also read more about today’s MAC announcement.

Thank you

Home Office communications"


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Re: BREXIT
« Reply #12 on: July 28, 2017, 12:50:28 AM »
Coming into daily contact with govt agencies, I can assure you there is precious little skill and capability to see something like this through properly with a definite result at the end. Policy making in this country is horrifically bad with a kick the can mentality. And why is this going to take over a year to do? They don't even know who is in the country now so how can they measure the economic impact? If I were to go to my EU partner's country either the tax authorities or the police would know damn well where I was and what I was up to, though I wouldn't come under EU rules at that point. It has never ceased to amaze me that there is no way in this country of tracking someone appropriately or proving who you are that doesn't involve a piece of paper issued by the *bleep*ing electric company or your amateur-hour landlord that could be easily forged.  ::)



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Re: BREXIT
« Reply #13 on: July 28, 2017, 10:06:18 AM »
My own big concerns, at present are:
...No EU citizen currently in the UK lawfully will be asked to leave at the point we leave the EU. In fact we will allow up to two years for people to regularise their status.
    The process to apply for settled status will be streamlined and user friendly, and will include those who already hold a permanent residence document under current free movement rules. We expect the system to be up and running in 2018.

EU citizens do not need to apply for documentation confirming their status now....."

Ok, SO, I'm here as EU, but am also Irish, so I have that fallback - for me, anyway. Won't help the kiddo. [Heard this morning that Ireland wants a sea border...interesting.] So as an EU here legally, they won't kick either of us out in March 2019. They'll give us 2 more years... which will have us having been here for 4 years, not the required 5. Again, unless they seriously backtrack, I could play the "Irish" card, but that would probably sink the kid. So I'll have to play "EU". I have to wonder how that is going to work? Double-secret probation for that last year, with a big price-tag?

Of course, if she goes on for a PhD, she'll have to go for a funded slot - and she may have to look to the EU for one of those and all this will be moot. And absence from the UK will wipe out the prior clock - for her. Plan "E". SOOOO much up in the air.

Point 2 - that EU citizens don't have to apply for any documentation now. I wonder if that is code for "we're not going to process anything now"?  Seriously, still no acknowledgment of our application for Residence Permit and Residency Cards - the latter of which is important to the kiddo as she will need to travel to conferences out of the country in several months as part of her studies. (Can't go if she can't get back in!) They haven't debited my checking account, sent any sort of acknowledgment of receipt, nothing. Making me nervous, as on all the immigration boards people have posted that their payment was taken within days of receipt. I've got the "signed for" by the Royal Mail at that address, so they have it. I know there's a backlog - I can see it in my mind's eye: stacks of bins of envelopes and packages...

Requested return of her passport on the 11th day after we sent it, got a confirmation number for that request, but nothing else. If it has not arrived by mid-week next week we have the option to fill in another form saying we haven't gotten it - may also try to phone them (what else to do with my money but pay phone charges? ::) )


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Re: BREXIT
« Reply #14 on: July 28, 2017, 11:15:11 AM »
, SO, I'm here as EU, but am also Irish, so I have that fallback - for me, anyway. Won't help the kiddo. [Heard this morning that Ireland wants a sea border...interesting.]

Isn't that more to do with the fact that the UK has now given the two year notice required, that the UK will be taking back UK waters and going back to international law instead? The ending of this fishing agreement will tie in with Brexit. It ends the UK's fishermens rights to fish in EU waters too, but something like 80% of EU fish is caught in UK and Irish waters.

The Scottish fishermen were overjoyed at this news as the EU only allow them a quota in their own waters and Brussels have bizarre polices than mean that tons of dead fish are thrown back in the water, which ruins fish stocks.

The most vocal of the EU countries about how unhappy they are at the UK taking back their waters, seems to have come from the Irish, French, Spanish and Dutch. The press reporting that the Republic of Ireland fishermen said the UK will have to chase them out of UK waters as they can't survive without using UK waters to fish.

« Last Edit: July 28, 2017, 11:37:11 AM by Sirius »


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