Author Topic: Private comprehensive medical insurance  (Read 821 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline farmgirl

  • *
  • Posts: 121
  • Joined: Jan 2016
  • Liked: 3
Private comprehensive medical insurance
« on: September 18, 2017, 01:26:09 PM »
 I am beginning to research comprehensive medical insurance. I know that there are websites for one can compare one insurance company to another insurance company and one policy to another policy. What I would like to hear from folks who have private comprehensive medical insurance, is who they ended up choosing.

 We are a family of four;  my husband, who has to citizenship/American and Irish/is leaning toward the self-sufficiency route. Whilst he has been offered a job, yay!, It is part time and at this point listed as temporary.  It may eventually go full-time and permanent but that will be well beyond the 90 day period.


Offline missially

  • *
  • Posts: 197
  • Joined: Feb 2016
  • Liked: 40
Re: Private comprehensive medical insurance
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2017, 04:47:24 PM »
Are you referring to insurance before you complete the probatory period on a visa or to supplement NHS? I am looking for the best deal possible because I know I will need to use it before getting NHS.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk


Offline Nan D.

  • *
  • Posts: 1586
  • Joined: Sep 2015
  • Liked: 185
Re: Private comprehensive medical insurance
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2017, 11:47:33 PM »
We went with VitalityHealth.  It offers GP consult via (android) cell phone, a number of "health" related perks, and a choice of various hospital lists. The cheapest option is to let their specialists choose the hospital you would go to for any non-emergency care.  For emergency care, you go to the NHS. Once you are no longer in the A&E, you can be transferred to one of their private facilities, if you want.

Offline Sirius

  • *
  • Posts: 2582
  • Joined: Sep 2014
  • Liked: 236
Re: Private comprehensive medical insurance
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2017, 12:23:34 PM »

 We are a family of four;  my husband, who has to citizenship/American and Irish/is leaning toward the self-sufficiency route. Whilst he has been offered a job, yay!, It is part time and at this point listed as temporary.  It may eventually go full-time and permanent but that will be well beyond the 90 day period.

Then take more than one part time job, even if it is not work that he saw himself doing. That way he can make sure he always keeps to what a worker qualified person is in that link I gave before.

Offline farmgirl

  • *
  • Posts: 121
  • Joined: Jan 2016
  • Liked: 3
Re: Private comprehensive medical insurance
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2017, 02:20:46 PM »
Then take more than one part time job, even if it is not work that he saw himself doing. That way he can make sure he always keeps to what a worker qualified person is in that link I gave before.

Right...that makes complete sense.  Here is a concern he (we) have...mainly running out of time to make sure he is a qualified worker person.  It has taken over 1-month to get this job offer.  He has been out nearly everyday looking for jobs, filling out online applications, etc.  There may be an age bias, a non-UK bias, but it is proving to take more time than anticipated. 

The 90-day period ends on November 14, 2017.  With any luck, my spouse will start working at the Wickes p/t job by/before the end of this month.  Not sure how often they pay, so not sure to what degree he will be able to show income (or steady income). 

He is seriously considering going the self-sufficiency route -- I suppose if all else fails.  This means purchasing CMI; I'm doing a little bit of reading in what is considered CMI for purposes of EEA self-sufficency and it seems like there are some opinions on this topic. 


Offline Sirius

  • *
  • Posts: 2582
  • Joined: Sep 2014
  • Liked: 236
Re: Private comprehensive medical insurance
« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2017, 12:29:24 PM »
There is always jobseeking qualified person but that is limiting. You would have to look at that Home Office staff link to see what they expect for that as it is not as straightforward as the EU's other types of "qualified person".


On the forums, it appears that quite a few have brought a CSI (Comprehensive Sickness Insurance) for everyone; to keep their stay lawful; if they have the funds to show they are self sufficient. Apart from Brexit, being a qualified person also means that their non-EEA citizen family members can work/go to UK state schools; all can use the NHS etc.

Nan's been all through this. :)


Keep a look out for shops advertising soon for the extra staff they need over Christmas.  It's better than nothing.
« Last Edit: September 20, 2017, 01:03:47 PM by Sirius »

Offline Sirius

  • *
  • Posts: 2582
  • Joined: Sep 2014
  • Liked: 236
Re: Private comprehensive medical insurance
« Reply #6 on: September 20, 2017, 02:27:18 PM »
You’ll be able to use the NHS without paying the surcharge or getting a reference number if:

    you’re applying for indefinite leave to enter or remain
    you’re a diplomat or a member of a visiting armed forces and not subject to immigration control
    you’re a dependant of a member of the UK’s armed forces
    you’re the dependant of a member of another country’s armed forces who is exempt from immigration control
    you’re a family member of a European national with European Union treaty rights
    you’re applying for a visa for the Isle of Man or Channel Islands
    you’re a British Overseas Territory citizen resident in the Falkland Islands
    you’re an asylum seeker or applying for humanitarian protection (or you’re their dependant)
    you’re a domestic worker who has been identified as a victim of slavery or human trafficking
    you’re applying for discretionary leave to remain in the UK as someone who has been identified as a victim of slavery or human trafficking (or you’re their dependant)
    the Home Office’s domestic violence concession applies to you (or you’re their dependant)
    being made to leave the UK would be against your rights under Article 3 of the European Convention of Human Rights (or you’re their dependant)

https://www.gov.uk/healthcare-immigration-application/who-needs-pay



That embolded bit about your EEA citizen spouse exercising "treaty rights" so that his family members can use the NHS bill free, then links to what an EEA citizen "qualified person" is.

A qualified person is someone who is in the UK and one of the following applies:

    they’re working
    they’re self-employed
    they’re self-sufficient
    they’re studying
    they’re looking for work (only if they meet certain conditions)

https://www.gov.uk/apply-for-a-uk-residence-card/eligibility


What counts as an EEA citizen "qualified person" in the UK
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/588174/EEA-qualified-persons-v4_0EXT.pdf

« Last Edit: September 20, 2017, 02:34:46 PM by Sirius »

Offline Nan D.

  • *
  • Posts: 1586
  • Joined: Sep 2015
  • Liked: 185
Re: Private comprehensive medical insurance
« Reply #7 on: September 20, 2017, 10:18:01 PM »
A few things.... If your husband finds work, you can apply for your RC cards online and use the European passport return service. EDIT:  WE [You] would do the application online, then print it and either take it down to Rutherglen or over to Edinburgh (you have to make an appointment), pay a small fee, and they'll photocopy and return your passports to you on the spot. They'll then mail the rest of the packet on to the HO people. Apparently it's no quicker than using the paper form, but the online form is a lot less murdered trees.  And you get your passports back the same day.

You ~can't~ use the online option or passport return service if your husband is applying as "self-sufficient" or if he does not apply (he's not required to) and you apply without him. You'll have to send all your passports (including his even if he doesn't apply) to Durham with your printed material and original documents proving your status, etc., including a summary of your CSI benefits. I sent in the whole darned insurance booklet (all 96 pages of what is/isn't covered) from my ex-employer when I sent in our materials in July, to be safe, and the Vitality Health booklet for my daughter. 

Best intentions aside, our packet wasn't opened/logged in until about six (or 7) weeks later. Supposedly once your materials are logged in you can request your passports back, so if you have to do the Self-sufficient application route, plan to not see those passports for a couple of months at the very best. I'm told that once you're in the system and request them back, you're supposed to get them within ten days. I made three inquiries and never got a response until they sent our entire packet back, so I can't vouch that they'll return them in those ten days, as advertised.

I am waiting to see how a job interview goes. If I am hired to start in the next few weeks, I intend to use the online option. If it's either not going to be immediate or I don't get hired, I'm going to resubmit using the "send everything as hardcopy to Durham" option. AND, I will pay for it with a postal money order or a check this time.  We got our whole packet returned after about 8 weeks of no communications because they said the credit card info was bad. We're hearing from various creditable sources that that happens a lot more than it should, and has (like in our case) happened even though the information provided was correct. (Our bank said no attempt had been made to run the card through, as far as they could tell.)

So, unless they've added a lot more bodies to be processing these, or unless the number of applications to Durham has dropped, if I send in our RC aps based on me being Self-sufficient by, say, Oct 15, I don't expect to even have a registration number until mid-December at the earliest. And if I immediately request the passports back, I don't expect we will see them until the end of January, if we're lucky.

If you have to do the same - Self-sufficient application to Durham, be absolutely sure to send it via a method that has tracking. (The Royal Mail has proven to be pretty good.) And don't forget to include as the value both the cost of shipping and what you'd have to pay to get all the passports (and other docs in the packet) replaced urgently when you are given the option to insure it.

Oh. And on the part-time job. I could have it wrong, but it's my understanding that any work, as long as it is "genuine and effective" counts as "worker". It doesn't have to be full-time. Again, unless I've got it wrong, the HMRC primary threshold for paying NI is £153 per week. So, about  £7.50 per hour for a minimum of 20 hours meets the threshold. (Based on 2015 figures - can't find anything more recent).

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/rates-and-thresholds-for-employers-2014-to-2015#class-1-national-insurance-thresholds
« Last Edit: September 21, 2017, 02:27:02 PM by Nan D. »

Offline Sirius

  • *
  • Posts: 2582
  • Joined: Sep 2014
  • Liked: 236
Re: Private comprehensive medical insurance
« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2017, 11:54:55 AM »
You would do the application online, then print it and either take it down to Rutherglen or over to Edinburgh (you have to make an appointment), pay a small fee, and they'll photocopy and return your passports to you on the spot.


farmgirl is in the County of Essex nan, which is East England.


So, unless they've added a lot more bodies to be processing these, or unless the number of applications to Durham has dropped,

Ha ha.  ;D No chance of the number of applications dropping. UKVI have been flooded by applications from the millions who entered the UK under the EU Directive or under the many European Court of Justice Rulings before the Leave the EU vote in June 2016. Then there all those who have arrived in the UK since 24 June 2016, hoping to be able to stay in the UK on Brexit, rather that exercise their treaty rights in one of the other 27 EEA countries that will remain in the EU.

I've been surprised by the number of Danish arriving in the UK too hoping to be able to stay and to get British citizenship, even though they are not allowed to be dual nationals. Or are already in the UK and applying for citizenship ASAP, as they see their future with the UK and not with the European Union.



Oh. And on the part-time job. I could have it wrong, but it's my understanding that any work, as long as it is "genuine and effective" counts as "worker". It doesn't have to be full-time. Again, unless I've got it wrong, the HMRC primary threshold for paying NI is £153 per week. So, about  £7.50 per hour for a minimum of 20 hours meets the threshold. (Based on 2015 figures - can't find anything more recent).

It's in that link I gave to what the UK counts as a qualified person. The UK had to set a MET (minimum earnings threshold) which at the moment is set just above the National Insurance Threshold.

The UK has been/are still, shutting down the many abuses from foreign nationals (EEA and UK immigration rules). For those who are on EEA rules and claimed to be a "worker qualified person" it was because this sort of abuse -
 
- non-EEA citizens marries an EEA citizen and then the EEA citizen doesn't work. To avoid having to buy CSIs for everyone (or they don't have the money to be self sufficient) they pretend the EEA citizen is self employed but doesn't make any money or only earns a few quid a week.

-an EEA family arrived with lots of children, one worked a Sunday lunchtime session in a pub and the family then went to the UK's welfare state and asked for benefits to keep their children and themselves (claimed benefits like Housing Benefit, Child Tax Credits, Child Benefit etc) and free healthcare too from the UK.

So the MET was brought in as a rough guide for the Home Office to use, which is presently set at about £153. Plus the  work must be also be "genuine and effective". It is not "genuine and effective" work  if they only earn that minimum £153 and then ask for thousands from the UK's welfare state per month because they don't want to work enough hours to keep their children. Brexit has caught these out too.

Offline Nan D.

  • *
  • Posts: 1586
  • Joined: Sep 2015
  • Liked: 185
Re: Private comprehensive medical insurance
« Reply #9 on: September 21, 2017, 03:05:03 PM »
That's kind of odd about the Danes. I would have thought it would be the other way around!

Pronoun corrected.

Offline Sirius

  • *
  • Posts: 2582
  • Joined: Sep 2014
  • Liked: 236
Re: Private comprehensive medical insurance
« Reply #10 on: September 21, 2017, 04:33:40 PM »
That's kind of odd about the Danes. I would have thought it would be the other way around!

Perhaps they moved for the same reasons you moved to the UK recently and want to stay on Brexit?

Or perhaps they have been reading the plans from Brussels on how to control EEA countries who won't do what they are told to do?

Or the planned changes to the EU budget now the UK won't be there to pay for all the poor countries - loans not gifts: that will drive those poor EEA countries into further poverty?

Or listened to Junker's speech the other day? It doesn't seem like the RoI have convinced the EU that they should be treated as a special case after Brexit. I did say months ago that it might be the EU who stops the Irish living in the UK.

Or the plans to have one corporation tax across the EU, that will hit the smaller EEA countires who rely on lower corporation tax rates. i.e the Republic of Ireland?

Or plans to have one EU president to rule all the EEA countries?

etc


« Last Edit: September 21, 2017, 05:41:15 PM by Sirius »

Offline Nan D.

  • *
  • Posts: 1586
  • Joined: Sep 2015
  • Liked: 185
Re: Private comprehensive medical insurance
« Reply #11 on: September 21, 2017, 06:38:32 PM »
Or they like the climate better.  ;)

Offline Sirius

  • *
  • Posts: 2582
  • Joined: Sep 2014
  • Liked: 236
Re: Private comprehensive medical insurance
« Reply #12 on: September 22, 2017, 09:54:53 AM »
Or they like the climate better.  ;)

 ;D People never move the the UK for our weather, but Denmark has their own national health service, so at least we know their citizens won't moving  to the UK for our NHS.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2017, 09:58:14 AM by Sirius »

Offline Nan D.

  • *
  • Posts: 1586
  • Joined: Sep 2015
  • Liked: 185
Re: Private comprehensive medical insurance
« Reply #13 on: September 22, 2017, 12:24:29 PM »
Umm, a substantial part of why we came was the weather....  ;D

Offline cdtaylornats

  • *
  • Posts: 83
  • Joined: Oct 2015
  • Liked: 11
Re: Private comprehensive medical insurance
« Reply #14 on: October 18, 2017, 11:10:40 PM »
The Danes have a 2000 year tradition of turning up here and staying on :)