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Topic: Allergy medicines  (Read 349 times)

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Allergy medicines
« on: October 22, 2020, 11:14:17 AM »
So in the USA I used to take Allegra or Allegra D in the morning for my allergies/sinus issues. At night if I was still having issues I would take Benadryl since it would also help me sleep. I know that Benadryl here is nondrowsy (I think it's the same medication as Zyrtec/Piriteze?), and you need a prescription for Allegra. I usually take Piriteze in the morning, but I am wondering if anyone here with allergies has any recommendations for something to take at night? Or even just something that helps you more than Piriteze? Thank you in advance.
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Re: Allergy medicines
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2020, 11:24:53 AM »
US Benadryl (diphenhydramine) is sold as Nytol sleeping tablets in the UK. It can be bought in 25mg tablets or 50 mg tablets.

However, it can only be legally sold as a sleeping aid, not an allergy medication, which should not be taken for more than about 5 nights.

A UK drowsy antihistamine which is sold for allergies is Piriton which contains chlorphenamine

The non-drowsy ones are:

UK Benadryl contains acrivastine (non-drowsy).

UK Piritize contains cetirizine, which is the same as Zirtek.

UK Clarityn contains loratadine.


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Re: Allergy medicines
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2020, 12:15:28 PM »
Speak to your GP if fexofenadine works best for you. I'm on high doses, but did need to go through an allergy consultant for it to be prescribed more than once a day. If sinus issues are significant there is also prescription dymista or azelastine that can help.

For fast acting (like benadryl) they recommend piriton here. I don't find that works as well for me, so I keep having family send me the dye free benadryl capsules from the US. But now that I'm on the higher dose fexofenadine it's not so bad and I don't need it as regularly.

Also, a HEPA and activated charcoal air filter in my bedroom makes a big difference. Without that I wake up feeling like hell every day.


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Re: Allergy medicines
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2020, 01:02:31 PM »
Thank you. I did try Nytol at one point, but I think it was only 25 mg, and it didn't seem to help all that much. I will look for the 50 mg or try Piriton. I also may ask my GP for a fexofenadine prescription (or a decongestant), but it's so much easier to just buy these medications in stores, and it's usually cheaper than 9 pounds.

A HEPA sounds like it might be an idea. Unfortunately my cat has been having issues too (coughing, wheezing), so maybe it would help her too. I may be making another post in the pet forum.
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Re: Allergy medicines
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2020, 02:34:39 PM »
Thank you. I did try Nytol at one point, but I think it was only 25 mg, and it didn't seem to help all that much. I will look for the 50 mg or try Piriton. I also may ask my GP for a fexofenadine prescription (or a decongestant), but it's so much easier to just buy these medications in stores, and it's usually cheaper than 9 pounds.

A HEPA sounds like it might be an idea. Unfortunately my cat has been having issues too (coughing, wheezing), so maybe it would help her too. I may be making another post in the pet forum.
Have you checked around your flat for mold? That's a major issue here, and so harmful to your health. Since your cat is also struggling, I'd consider the common allergens and also make sure your carbon monoxide detector is working.

If you need more than 1 script a month, you can get a prepaid prescription certificate for about £11/mo. It is SO worth it. All of my sinus, asthma, and allergy meds are covered by it. And that is so much less than I ever paid in the US for allergy meds. Benadryl isn't really safe long term (has been associated with dementia and other things) so it's much safer to be on fexofenadine or cetirizine. https://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/help-nhs-prescription-costs/prescription-prepayment-certificates-ppcs


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Re: Allergy medicines
« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2020, 06:06:02 PM »
Have you checked around your flat for mold? That's a major issue here, and so harmful to your health. Since your cat is also struggling, I'd consider the common allergens and also make sure your carbon monoxide detector is working.

If you need more than 1 script a month, you can get a prepaid prescription certificate for about £11/mo. It is SO worth it. All of my sinus, asthma, and allergy meds are covered by it. And that is so much less than I ever paid in the US for allergy meds. Benadryl isn't really safe long term (has been associated with dementia and other things) so it's much safer to be on fexofenadine or cetirizine. https://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/help-nhs-prescription-costs/prescription-prepayment-certificates-ppcs
We do have some mold in the bathroom. When my husband called the council about it, they e-mailed information about ventilating the bathroom to prevent mold. They said to try that before scheduling an appointment with them.  I'm not sure how that's supposed to help with the mold that's already there. We have a huge window in there, but it's difficult to close with how far it swings open. I would like to get a fan put in, but I'm not sure how to install one.

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October 30th: submitted online application
November 8th: biometrics taken
November 11th: Online application received in Sheffield
November 12th: passport and documents sent via UPS
November 13th: documents received in NY
December 5th: "application has been concluded" text message
December 9th: passport received via UPS. Approved!
December 30th: Arrived in UK


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Re: Allergy medicines
« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2020, 06:08:15 PM »


If you need more than 1 script a month, you can get a prepaid prescription certificate for about £11/mo. It is SO worth it. All of my sinus, asthma, and allergy meds are covered by it. And that is so much less than I ever paid in the US for allergy meds. Benadryl isn't really safe long term (has been associated with dementia and other things) so it's much safer to be on fexofenadine or cetirizine. https://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/help-nhs-prescription-costs/prescription-prepayment-certificates-ppcs

I forgot to reply to this part. Thank you for this suggestion. I didn't know I could get a prepaid subscription. That would help a lot.



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October 30th: submitted online application
November 8th: biometrics taken
November 11th: Online application received in Sheffield
November 12th: passport and documents sent via UPS
November 13th: documents received in NY
December 5th: "application has been concluded" text message
December 9th: passport received via UPS. Approved!
December 30th: Arrived in UK


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Re: Allergy medicines
« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2020, 07:17:38 PM »
We do have some mold in the bathroom. When my husband called the council about it, they e-mailed information about ventilating the bathroom to prevent mold. They said to try that before scheduling an appointment with them.  I'm not sure how that's supposed to help with the mold that's already there. We have a huge window in there, but it's difficult to close with how far it swings open. I would like to get a fan put in, but I'm not sure how to install one.

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Oh how I wish bathroom fans were a thing here. We have the same issue. Constantly using vinegar to help keep it at bay, but its so annoying! We open windows anytime we shower and run a dehumidifier in the room where we dry our laundry as well. Good luck!

And pleased to have shared the NHS PPC with you! It is so helpful once you have repeat prescriptions, it makes it so much easier to not feel guilty for needing meds and staying in compliance.


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Re: Allergy medicines
« Reply #8 on: October 27, 2020, 10:18:28 AM »
Oh how I wish bathroom fans were a thing here. We have the same issue. Constantly using vinegar to help keep it at bay, but its so annoying! We open windows anytime we shower and run a dehumidifier in the room where we dry our laundry as well. Good luck!

And pleased to have shared the NHS PPC with you! It is so helpful once you have repeat prescriptions, it makes it so much easier to not feel guilty for needing meds and staying in compliance.

We have a bathroom fan.  It is a thing over here...?
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Re: Allergy medicines
« Reply #9 on: October 27, 2020, 10:52:34 AM »
I think bathroom fans are common enough, we did a trip to Northumberland last month and the rental house had fans, exhausting to the outside, in all 3 bathrooms plus the kitchen.

I think mold is becoming more common since the subsidy driven push to insulate houses this last 10 years.  The rental house we moved into when we first moved back in 2016 had mold in the bedroom and entrance hall, and our landlord, who lived in the street behind, said that his father-in-law, who had owned the house, had cavity wall insulation plus so much extra loft insulation that you can't see where the rafters are.

Our good friends in the town have been in the same situation so this summer had ridge ventilation tiles installed, plus we saw another house a few weeks ago having ventilation tiles installed.
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Re: Allergy medicines
« Reply #10 on: October 27, 2020, 11:08:43 AM »
Ah, none of the houses we saw when looking for a rental had a bathroom fan, nor have any of the B&Bs we've stayed at. There is no insulation in our house, but mold around the window frames is constant because of the condensation as soon as it gets cold. We use the trickle vents during the day but at night I need the quiet. I thought the lack of insulation would contribute to it because of condensation on cold walls.


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